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Editorial Board

  • S Abdul Rahaman, Bharathidasan University, India
  • Shanmugam Ramar, Pratap University, India
  • Mohamed Abdirehman Hassan, Tearfund Deutschland e.V, Somalia
  • Agnieszka Malinowska, AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland
    Editorial Board

 Journal of Business and Management Revolution

Open Access  |  Peer-reviewed, Fast Publication

Guest Editor: Prof. Dr. Bulent Acma  
Editorial Board: Link

ISSN 2435-7286
DOI Index 10.37357/1068/jbmr

Journal of Business and Management Revolution (JBMR) is a peer-reviewed publication aims to promote innovative business and management best practices within innovative theories and researches in lieu of traditional approaches. This journal accords up-to-date publications of interdisciplinary researches of scientific excellence within technologies innovations, engineering practices, industrial revolutions, business and finance transitions, socio-economic development, and eco-system preservation theories and practices.
This journal calls for a broad range of disciplines (management, business, leadership, economics, finance, banking, governance, marketing, administration, entrepreneurship, policy, strategy, and etc.) in the form of original researches, review article, letter, report, case study, methodology, lesson-learned, commentary, communication, editorial, technical note, and book review. Topics related to this journal include but are not limited to:

Business theories
Business models
Business case studies
Operations management
Transition management
Project management
Program management
Portfolio management
Strategic management
Tourism management
Business governance
Business management
Organizational management
Entrepreneurship
Finance practices
Finance management
Industrial management
Supply chain management
Global business approaches
Corporate governance
Investments strategies
Finance and banking
Industrial engineering

Keywords

Information technology management
Finance theories
Valuation management
Finance investment
Loan finance and management
Insurance management
Investment strategies
Innovative approaches
Archaeology management
Industrial revolution
Insurance
Real estate finance
Microcredit
Risk and return
Taxation
Microeconomics

Published Articles

 Journal Article     Open Access      Published     
A concise review of green supply chain management within organization reform 
Zaheb H, Karimy H, Sabory NR, and Danish MSS.
Journal of Business and Management Revolution, 2022, 3 (1): 1-5  DOI 10.37357/1068/jbmr/3.1.01

Abstract
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Authors
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Abstract

Green-supply chain management practices improve organizational performance from a financial and non-financial perspective. This study aims to evaluate the impact of green supply chain strategies on organizational performance. High involvement of waste reduces the efficiency of the supply chain process, which ultimately creates an adverse impact on the performance of an organization. The lack of waste reduction strategies affects the environment in terms of pollution and over-consumption of energy. This study is descriptive, and the SLR (Systematic literature review) approach is used to evaluate the impact of green practices on organizational performance. The green supply chain practices reduce the company's cost because green strategies eliminate valueless elements for customers and increase the price. The research contributes to the field of academics and business as well. From a theoretical point of view, the desired study extends the literature for future scholars. From a business perspective, the selected research suggests strategies to reduce supply chain waste. Secondary research is used to collect the data, and results will be generated after evaluating peer-reviewed articles from authentic journals. It is concluded that green practices are the need of the present business era because businesses have to reduce waste and contribute to environmental protection to get a competitive advantage.

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Authors

Hameedullah Zaheb
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

 

Hedayatullah Karimy 
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

 

Najib Rahman Sabory
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

 

Mir Sayed Shah Danish 
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

 

References

Diab S, AL-Bourini F, Abu-Rumman A (2015) “The impact of green supply chain management practices on organizational performance: A study of Jordanian food industries” J Manag Sustain (vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 149–157) https://doi.org/10.5539/jms.v5n1p149

Abu Seman NA, Govindan K, Mardani A, Zakuan N, Mat Saman MZ, et al. (2019) “The mediating effect of green innovation on the relationship between green supply chain management and environmental performance” J Clean Prod (vol. 229, pp. 115–127) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.03.211

Lopes de Sousa Jabbour AB, Vazquez-Brust D, Jose Chiappetta Jabbour C, Latan H (2017) “Green supply chain practices and environmental performance in Brazil: Survey, case studies, and implications for B2B” Ind Mark Manag (vol. 66, pp. 13–28) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2017.05.003

Choi D, Hwang T (2015) “The impact of green supply chain management practices on firm performance: the role of collaborative capability” Oper Manag Res (vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 69–83) https://doi.org/10.1007/s12063-015-0100-x

Tachizawa EM, Gimenez C, Sierra V (2015) “Green supply chain management approaches: drivers and performance implications” Int J Oper Prod Manag (vol. 35, no. 11, pp. 1546–1566) https://doi.org/10.1108/IJOPM-01-2015-0023

Younis H, Sundarakani B, Vel P (2016) “The impact of implementing green supply chain management practices on corporate performance” Univ Wollongong Dubai (vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 216–245) https://doi.org/10.1108/CR-04-2015-0024

Jabbour ABL de S, Frascareli FC de O, Jabbour CJC (2015) “Green supply chain management and firms’ performance: Understanding potential relationships and the role of green sourcing and some other green practices” Resour Conserv Recycl (vol. 104, pp. 366–374) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resconrec.2015.07.017

Laari S, Töyli J, Solakivi T, Ojala L (2016) “Firm performance and customer-driven green supply chain management” J Clean Prod (vol. 112, pp. 1960–1970) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2015.06.150

Cherrafi A, Garza-Reyes JA, Kumar V, Mishra N, Ghobadian A, et al. (2018) “Lean, green practices and process innovation: A model for green supply chain performance” Int J Prod Econ (vol. 206, pp. 79–92) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2018.09.031

Balasubramanian S, Shukla V (2017) “Green supply chain management: an empirical investigation on the construction sector” Supply Chain Manag Int J (vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 58–81) https://doi.org/10.1108/SCM-07-2016-0227

Al-Ghwayeen WS, Abdallah AB (2018) “Green supply chain management and export performance: The mediating role of environmental performance” J Manuf Technol Manag (vol. 29, no. 7, pp. 1233–1252) https://doi.org/10.1108/JMTM-03-2018-0079

Malviya RK, Kant R (2015) “Green supply chain management (GSCM): a structured literature review and research implications” Benchmarking Int J (vol. 22, no. 7, pp. 1360–1394) https://doi.org/10.1108/BIJ-01-2014-0001

Masa’deh R, Alananzeh O, Algiatheen N, Ryati R, Albayyari R, et al. (2017) “The impact of employee’s perception of implementing green supply chain management on hotel’s economic and operational performance” J Hosp Tour Technol (vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 395–416) https://doi.org/10.1108/JHTT-02-2017-0011

Lee SM, Choi D (2021) “Supply chain governance mechanisms, green supply chain management, and organizational performance” Sustainability (vol. 13, no. 23, pp. 13146) https://doi.org/10.3390/su132313146

Mangla SK, Kumar P, Barua MK (2015) “Flexible decision modeling for evaluating the risks in green supply chain using Fuzzy AHP and IRP methodologies” Glob J Flex Syst Manag (vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 19–35) https://doi.org/10.1007/s40171-014-0081-x

Zhu Q, Feng Y, Choi S-B (2017) “The role of customer relational governance in environmental and economic performance improvement through green supply chain management” J Clean Prod (vol. 155, pp. 46–53) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.02.124

Shibin KT, Gunasekaran A, Papadopoulos T, Dubey R, Singh M, et al. (2016) “Enablers and barriers of flexible green supply chain management: A total interpretive structural modeling approach” Glob J Flex Syst Manag (vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 171–188) https://doi.org/10.1007/s40171-015-0109-x

Schmidt CG, Foerstl K, Schaltenbrand B (2017) “The Supply Chain Position Paradox: Green Practices and Firm Performance” J Supply Chain Manag (vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 3–25) https://doi.org/10.1111/jscm.12113

Mishra D, Gunasekaran A, Papadopoulos T, Hazen B (2017) “Green supply chain performance measures: A review and bibliometric analysis” Sustain Prod Consum (vol. 10, pp. 85–99) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.spc.2017.01.003

Wu K-J, Liao C-J, Tseng M-L, Chiu ASF (2015) “Exploring decisive factors in green supply chain practices under uncertainty” Int J Prod Econ (vol. 159, pp. 147–157) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2014.09.030

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article     Open Access      Published     
Society empowerment by sustaining volunteerism culture
Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Tayarani SM, Marasigan MAJ, Zaheb H, Gebarowska A, and Grilli ML.
Journal of Business and Management Revolution, 2021, 2 (1): 1-9  DOI 10.37357/1068/jbmr/2.1.01

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Authors
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Abstract

This study interrogates the role of volunteers in society empowerment to enable students with a broad view of volunteerism as a first action. This study aims to encourage volunteer research, education, and social activities at the undergraduate and graduate students' levels.  At first sight, significant workforce needs exist in educational research and studies, while only a small percentage of students volunteer their services. Consequently, many students miss the opportunity to give back to the community and excel in their academic and career assets in the long run. The analysis exposed that students are the first beneficially in unique ways if they volunteer in research and education. It is also observed that research immensely impacts learning, and knowledge positively influences society. Therefore, by implication, volunteer activities in research and education will benefit young volunteers and communities. Besides, volunteer opportunities are readily available to students. Also, conducting volunteer activities has been impactful on the overall performance rating. A volunteer should train and learn best practices and behavior. It will promote educational research, student success and improve livelihood in the community. In conclusion, this study reveals that volunteering in the field of education and research is critically important for students to participate in volunteer activities.

 

Citation

 

 

 

 

Authors

Mir Sayed Shah Danish
Strategic Research Project Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Tomonobu Senjyu
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Seyedeh Maryam Tayarani
Department of Academic Affairs, Research and Education Promotion Association (REPA), Okinawa 900-0015, Japan

 

Michell Ann Julieth Marasigan
Liaison Office, Research and Education Promotion Association (REPA), Okinawa 900-0015, Japan

 

Hameedullah Zaheb
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Alexandra Gebarowska
Department of Academic Affairs, Research and Education Promotion Association (REPA), Okinawa 900-0015, Japan

 

Maria Luisa Grilli
Department of Energy Technologies and Renewable Sources, Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), Casaccia Research Centre, 00123 Rome, Italy

References

Nathan C. Manual on volunteer services in public welfare. Washington: Dept. of Health Education, and Welfare, Social and Rehabilitation Service; 1972.

Volunteering in the United States News Release [Internet]. Bls.gov. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/volun_02252016.htm

Bentson M. Volunteer Coordinator Handbook for Volunteer Programs Teaching Esl to Refugee Students. Tacoma Community House Training Project; 1983.

Packham C. The Role of Youth and Community Work Training in Relation to Volunteers. 2008.

Brennan M. Placing Volunteers at the Center of Community Development [Internet]. Semanticscholar.org. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Placing-Volunteers-at-the-Center-of-Community-Brennan/9dce9cfdd3fac09e135aadb29cd4e9abd7806100

Douglas P, Ryan T, Beller G, Hines E, Livingston D, McEntee C et al. Task Force 6: Code of Conduct for Staff and Volunteer Leadership. Circulation. 2004; 110 (16):2538-2549.

ATLANTIS PRESS. Fostering Voluntarism in Digital Age [Internet]. 2019. Available from: https://download.atlantis-press.com/proceedings/acec-19/125937433

Hall-Ellis S, Grealy D. [Internet]. Pdfs.semanticscholar.org. 2013 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: ttps://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/d41d/32a3239a7a4d43475e9744206787e697bf59.pdf

Benefits of Performing Community Service in College [Internet]. Great Value Colleges. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.greatvaluecolleges.net/lists/5-benefits-of-performing-community-service-in-college/

HuffPost is now a part of Verizon Media [Internet]. Huffpost.com. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.huffpost.com/entry/middle-school-grades-volunteering_n_56293e48e4b0aac0b8fc3508

Volunteering Produces Health Benefits - AmeriCorps Alums [Internet]. Americorpsalums.org. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.americorpsalums.org/page/LNVolunteerHealth

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How To Combat Barriers To Volunteering In 2019 [Internet]. Third Sector Protect. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.thirdsectorprotect.co.uk/blog/barriers-to-volunteering/

Volunteer Opportunities for College Students [Internet]. Vault. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.vault.com/blogs/admit-one-vaults-mba-law-school-and-college-blog/7-volunteer-opportunities-for-college-students

Hunter E. Voluntarism, Virtuous Citizenship, and Nation-Building in Late Colonial and Early Postcolonial Tanzania. African Studies Review. 2015; 58 (2):48-49.

The Impact of Research on Education on JSTOR [Internet]. Jstor.org. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.jstor.org/stable/20495397?read-now=1&seq=6#page_scan_tab_contents

Active Involvement of Volunteers [Internet]. Uniteforsight.org. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: http://www.uniteforsight.org/effective-program-development/module8

Suaedy A. The Role of Volunteers and Political Participation in the 2012 Jakarta Gubernatorial Election. Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs. 2014;33 (1):125-133.

Project B. The Top 10 Effects Education Has on Society | The Borgen Project [Internet]. The Borgen Project. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://borgenproject.org/effects-education-has-on-society/#:~:text=Educationleadstoeconomicprosperity,soldontheopenmarket.

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[Internet]. Vsointernational.org. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.vsointernational.org/sites/default/files/the_role_of_volunteering_in_sustainable_development_2015_vso_ids.pdf

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Kolnhofer Derecskei, A., & Nagy, V. (2020). Employee Volunteerism—Conceptual Study and the Current Situation. Sustainability, 12(20), 8378. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208378

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published  
Socio-economic barriers to children’s education in Afghanistan: A case study of Kabul city 
Khan AB.
Journal of Business and Management Revolution, 2020, 1 (1): 1-9  DOI 10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Having been a war zone for the last four decades, Afghanistan is one of the developing countries where affordable access to quality education is still a dream for many of its people. According to the 2017 UNICEF Annual Report, over 40% (3.7 million) of school-age children were out of school in Afghanistan. In order to better design projects and programs that are working towards reducing this number, it is necessary first to understand the root causes of the issue. The objective of this research is to assess and analyze some of the various social and economic barriers that keep children out of school in Kabul City and hence, offer additional key information and recommendations for limiting this critical issue. Primary data of 300 children were collected through a survey conducted randomly in Kabul City. The target population of this survey were working children (between the ages of 5 and 18) and parents from households of different ethnic, linguistic, and regional backgrounds. Poverty and cultural limitations were found to be the most common factors preventing Afghan children from going to school. Other factors like access, physical disability, guardian’s type and education level, lack of infrastructure, child labor, and gender discrimination may also contribute to this issue. Results of the analysis suggest that government agencies can play a significant role in facilitating affordable access to quality education for all children by extending coverage of public schools, offering reasonable financial grants for poor families in order to avoid the need for child labor, and bringing necessary legal reforms in the traditional norms to discourage child marriage and gender discrimination.

Citation

REPA

Khan AB (2020) “Socio-economic barriers to children’s education in Afghanistan:  A case study of Kabul city” Journal of Management and Business Revolution (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–9) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01

 

APA

Khan, A. B. (2020). Socio-economic barriers to children’s education in Afghanistan: A case study of Kabul city. Journal of Business and Management Revolution, 1(1), 1–9. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01

 

MLA

Khan, Abdul Baseer. “Socio-Economic Barriers to Children’s Education in Afghanistan:  A Case Study of Kabul City.” Journal of Business and Management Revolution, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020, pp. 1–9. Zotero, doi:10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01.

 

Vancouver

Khan AB. Socio-economic barriers to children’s education in Afghanistan:  A case study of Kabul city. J Bus Manage Rev. 2020;1(1):1–9.

 

Chicago

Khan, Abdul Baseer. 2020. “Socio-Economic Barriers to Children’s Education in Afghanistan:  A Case Study of Kabul City.” Journal of Business and Management Revolution 1 (1): 1–9. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01.

 

Elsevier

Khan, A.B., 2020. Socio-economic barriers to children’s education in Afghanistan:  A case study of Kabul city. J. Bus. Manage. Rev. 1, 1–9. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01

 

IEEE

  1. B. Khan, “Socio-economic barriers to children’s education in Afghanistan:  A case study of Kabul city,” J. Bus. Manage. Rev., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–9, 2020, doi: 10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01.

 

Springer

Khan, A.B.: Socio-economic barriers to children’s education in Afghanistan:  A case study of Kabul city. J. Bus. Manage. Rev. 1, 1–9 (2020). https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01.

Authors

Abdul Baseer Khan
Department of Business, Faculty of Business Administration, American University of Afghanistan (AUAF), Kabul, Afghanistan

References
  1. All in school and learning: Global Initiative on out-of-school children – Afghanistan country study (2018) Afghanistan country study Kabul, Afghanistan, Ministry of Education, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (unicef). (https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/afg-report-oocs2018.pdf) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  2. Central Statistics Organization (CSO) - Afghanistan (2018) “Afghanistan living conditions survey (2016-2017)” Analysis report Kabul, Afghanistan, Central Statistics Organization (CSO) of Afghanistan. (https://washdata.org/sites/default/files/documents/reports/2018-07/AfghanistanALCS2016-17Analysisreport.pdf) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  3. Auturupane H, Gunatilake R, Shojo M, Ebenezer R (2013) “Education attainment in Afghanistan: An economic analysis” Discussion Paper Series Washington DC., USA, The World Bank. (https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/16285) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  4. Lin T, Lv H (2017) “The effects of family income on children’s education: An empirical analysis of CHNS data” Proceeding on the 4th International Conference on Information Technology and Career Education Asian Academic Press - pp. 49–54. https://doi.org/10.24104/rmhe/2017.04.02002

  5. Hunte P (2006) “Looking beyond the school walls: Household decision-making and school enrolment in Afghanistan” Briefing Paper Kabul, Afghanistan, Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU). (https://areu.org.af/publication/607/) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  6. Guimbert S, Miwa K, Thanh Nguyen D (2008) “Back to school in Afghanistan: Determinants of school enrollment” International Journal of Educational Development (vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 419–434) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijedudev.2007.11.004

  7. Shayan Z (2015) “Gender Inequality in Education in Afghanistan: Access and Barriers” Open Journal of Philosophy (vol. 05, no. 05, pp. 277–284) https://doi.org/10.4236/ojpp.2015.55035

  8. From access to equality: empowering girls and women through literacy and secondary education (2012) Paris, France, United Nations Education, Science and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). (https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000218450) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  9. Pherali T, Sahar A (2018) “Learning in the chaos: A political economy analysis of education in Afghanistan” Research in Comparative and International Education (vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 239–258) https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918781882

  10. Berry J de, Fazili A, Farhad S, Nasiry F, Hashemi S, et al. (2003) “The children of Kabul: Discussions with Afghan families” Kabul, Afghanistan, Save the Children Federation, Inc. (https://resourcecentre.savethechildren.net/node/2601/pdf/2601.pdf) Accessed: 1 November 2019

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published  
Hypothesizing resurgence of financial inclusion to reduce poverty in Afghanistan 
Azimi MN.
Journal of Business and Management Revolution, 2020, 1 (1): 10-13  DOI 10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.02

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Reducing poverty is a critical topic of policy discussion across the world. Developing countries and post-conflict environments commonly face poverty growth. At present, Afghanistan is experiencing the highest rate of poverty in the world; only one tenth of the Afghan population has access to financial services that are mostly localized within the capital and regional cities. In this paper I hypothesize financial inclusion as a contextualized model that can significantly reduce the rate of poverty. I use a set of timeseries data on financial inclusion determinants excluding insurance as the explanatory variables and linearly regress them on the rate of poverty from 2004 to 2018. The statistical results reveal that ATMs per 100,000 adults in the country significantly reduce poverty by 0.25% by increasing capital mobility and remittances. Credit cards and borrowing facilities to the informal economy have significant coefficients of 0.00635% and 0.0207% respectively on poverty reduction as an emergent strategy. The security variable has a significant coefficient of 41% reduction of poverty. Among all other variables tested, extending mobile money facilities is also significant and reduces poverty by 0.015%.

Citation

REPA

Azimi MN (2020) “Hypothesizing resurgence of financial inclusion to reduce poverty in Afghanistan” Journal of Management and Business Revolution (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 10–13) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jmbr.1.1.02

 

APA

Azimi, M. N. (2020). Hypothesizing resurgence of financial inclusion to reduce poverty in Afghanistan. Journal of Business and Management Revolution, 1(1), 10–13. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jmbr.1.1.02

 

MLA

Azimi, Mohammad Naim. “Hypothesizing Resurgence of Financial Inclusion to Reduce Poverty in Afghanistan.” Journal of Business and Management Revolution, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020, pp. 10–13, doi:10.37357/1068/jmbr.1.1.02.

 

Vancouver

Azimi MN. Hypothesizing resurgence of financial inclusion to reduce poverty in Afghanistan. J Bus Manage Rev. 2020;1(1):10–3.

 

Chicago

Azimi, Mohammad Naim. 2020. “Hypothesizing Resurgence of Financial Inclusion to Reduce Poverty in Afghanistan.” Journal of Business and Management Revolution 1 (1): 10–13. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jmbr.1.1.02.

 

Elsevier

Azimi, M.N., 2020. Hypothesizing resurgence of financial inclusion to reduce poverty in Afghanistan. J. Bus. Manage. Rev. 1, 10–13. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jmbr.1.1.02

 

IEEE

  1. N. Azimi, “Hypothesizing resurgence of financial inclusion to reduce poverty in Afghanistan,” J. Bus. Manage. Rev., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 10–13, 2020, doi: 10.37357/1068/jmbr.1.1.02.

 

Springer

Azimi, M.N.: Hypothesizing resurgence of financial inclusion to reduce poverty in Afghanistan. J. Bus. Manage. Rev. 1, 10–13 (2020). https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jmbr.1.1.02.

Authors

Mohammad Naim Azimi
Department of Statistics and Econometrics, Faculty of Economics, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

References
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  4. Morgan P, Pontines V (2014) “Financial Stability and Financial Inclusion”

  5. Donovan K (2012) “Mobile Money for Financial Inclusion” Information and Communications for Development, World Bank Group (pp. 61–73) https://doi.org/10.1596/9780821389911_ch04

  6. Finance M of (2018) “National Financial Inclusion Strategy”

  7. Ghosh J (2013) “Microfinance and the challenge of financial inclusion for development” Cambridge Journal of Economics (vol. 37, no. 6, pp. 1203–1219) https://doi.org/10.1093/cje/bet042

  8. Mader P (2018) “Contesting Financial Inclusion” Development and Change (vol. 49, no. 2, pp. 461–483) https://doi.org/10.1111/dech.12368

  9. Zins A, Weill L (2016) “The determinants of financial inclusion in Africa” Review of Development Finance (vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 46–57) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rdf.2016.05.001

  10. Fungáčová Z, Weill L (2014) “Understanding financial inclusion in China” China Economic Review (vol. 34, pp. 196–206) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chieco.2014.12.004

  11. Demirguc-kunt, A., and Klapper L (2012) “Measuring financial inclusion. The Global findex database” p. ISBN: 978-0-8213-9509-7

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Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.