loader image

REPA Peer-reviewed Journal

Open Access  |  Peer-reviewed  |  Fast Publication

Articles

 Journal Article     Open Access      Published     
A review on energy efficiency for pathetic environmental trends mitigation
Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Ahmadi M, Ludin GA, Ahadi MH, Karimy H, and Khosravy M.
Journal of Sustainability Outreach (ISSN 2435-7243), 2021, 2 (1): 1-8  DOI 10.37357/1068/jso.2.1.01

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Environmental sustainability and climate changes mitigation are linked with energy efficiency and renewable energy deployment. Whereas, renewable energy exploitation at large scale generation needs high initial investment, which is not achievable in short to medium terms, especially in developing countries. Therefore, energy efficiency measures as a good alternative for environmental sustainability are the researchers' interest to evaluate its potential from individual energy consumers to utility-scale (generation, transmission, and distribution). Referring to literature and the connection between the second law of thermodynamics and environmental impact, environmental effects are reduced due to low energy when energy efficiency increases. Therefore, assuring demanding efficiency, interrelations studies, and impact analysis of influential factors are known exigence. This study draws a thematic perspective that involves an exhaustive investigation, explaining the relationship between exergy, environment, and energy within optimum efficiency requirements. Also, this study deals with indicators and indices in adapt to energy and environmental demand to reveal the underlying fundamental impressing forces regarding efficiency improvement.

 

Citation

 

 

 

Authors

Mir Sayed Shah Danish
Strategic Research Project Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 9030213, Japan

 

Tomonobu Senjyu
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 9030213, Japan

 

Mikaeel Ahmadi
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 9030213, Japan


Gul Ahmad Ludin
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 9030213, Japan

 

Mohammad Hamid Ahadi
Department of Intellectual Cooperation, Research and Education Promotion Association (REPA), Okinawa 900-0015, Japan

 

Hedayatullah Karimy
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul 1006, Afghanistan

 

Mahdi Khosravy
Media Integrated Communication Laboratory, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 Japan

 

 

References

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Ibrahimi AM, Ahmadi M, Howlader AM (2019) “A managed framework for energy-efficient building” Journal of Building Engineering (vol. 21, pp. 120–128) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jobe.2018.10.013

Liu G (2014) “Development of a general sustainability indicator for renewable energy systems: A review” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 31, pp. 611–621) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2013.12.038

Basiago AD (1998) “Economic, social, and environmental sustainability in development theory and urban planning practice” The Environmentalist (vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 145–161) https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1006697118620

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Danish SMS, Sabory NR, K N, et al. (2019) “A Recap of Voltage Stability Indices in the Past Three Decades” Energies (vol. 12, no. 8, pp. 1544) https://doi.org/10.3390/en12081544

Danish MSS, Yona A, Senjyu T (2015) “A Review of Voltage Stability Assessment Techniques with an Improved Voltage Stability Indicator” International Journal of Emerging Electric Power Systems (vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 107–115) https://doi.org/10.1515/ijeeps-2014-0167

Wang J-J, Jing Y-Y, Zhang C-F, Zhao J-H (2009) “Review on multi-criteria decision analysis aid in sustainable energy decision-making” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 13, no. 9, pp. 2263–2278) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2009.06.021

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Zaheb H, Sabory NR, Ibrahimi AM, et al. (2019) “A novel transdisciplinary paradigm for municipal solid waste to energy” Journal of Cleaner Production (vol. 233, pp. 880–892)

Yaqobi MA, Matayoshi H, Danish MSS, Urasaki N, Howlader AM, et al. (2018) “Control and energy management strategy of standalone DC microgrid cluster using PV and battery storage for rural application” International Journal of Power and Energy Research (vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 53–68) https://doi.org/10.22606/ijper.2018.24001

Ibrahimi AM, Howlader HOR, Danish MSS, Shigenobu R, Sediqi MM, et al. (n.d.) “Optimal Unit Commitment with Concentrated Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage in Afghanistan Electrical System” International Journal of Emerging Electric Power Systems

Danish SMS, Ahmadi M, Danish MSS, Mandal P, Yona A, et al. (2020) “A coherent strategy for peak load shaving using energy storage systems” Journal of Energy Storage (vol. 32, pp. 101823) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.est.2020.101823

Piacentino A, Duic N, Markovska N, Mathiesen BV, Guzović Z, et al. (2019) “Sustainable and cost-efficient energy supply and utilisation through innovative concepts and technologies at regional, urban and single-user scales” Energy (vol. 182, pp. 254–268) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2019.06.015

Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Wali M, Lotfy ME, Senjyu T (2019) “A sustainable building planning, modeling, and optimization within the smart city appraisal” International Journal on: Proceedings of Science and Technolgy Sepang, Malaysia, IEREK - pp. (in press).

Guelpa E, Bischi A, Verda V, Chertkov M, Lund H (2019) “Towards future infrastructures for sustainable multi-energy systems: A review” Energy (vol. 184, pp. 2–21) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2019.05.057

Hafizyar M, Arsallan AR, Sabory NR, Danish MSS, Senjyu T (2021) “Smart and sustainable township: An overview” In: Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Sabory NR - editors. Sustainability Outreach in Developing Countries Singapore, Springer Singapore - pp. 65–80. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-7179-4_5 (http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-981-15-7179-4_5) Accessed: 18 November 2020

Urbaniec K, Mikulčić H, Rosen MA, Duić N (2017) “A holistic approach to sustainable development of energy, water and environment systems” Journal of Cleaner Production (vol. 155, pp. 1–11) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.01.119

Danish MSS, Zaheb H, Sabory NR, Karimy H, Faiq AB, et al. (2019) “The Road Ahead for Municipal Solid Waste Management in the 21st Century: A Novel-standardized Simulated Paradigm” IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science IOP Publishing, vol. 291 - pp. 1–5. https://doi.org/10.1088/1755-1315/291/1/012009

Heras-Saizarbitoria I, Boiral O, Allur E (2018) “Three Decades of Dissemination of ISO 9001 and Two of ISO 14001: Looking Back and Ahead” In: Heras-Saizarbitoria I - editor. ISO 9001, ISO 14001, and New Management Standards Cham, Springer International Publishing - pp. 1–15. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-65675-5_1 (https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-65675-5_1) Accessed: 17 July 2021

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Sabory NR: editors (2021) “Sustainability Outreach in Developing Countries,” 1st ed. Singapore, Singapore, Springer Singapore. 202 p. ISBN: 9789811571787 (https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811571787) Accessed: 16 July 2020

Awasthi MD, Pandey MK, Chauhan T, Danish MSS, Kumar D, et al. (2021) “Contemporary developments in waste water treatment technologies” Eco-Friendly Energy Processes and Technologies for Achieving Sustainable Development: Pennsylvania, United States, IGI Global - pp. 196–219. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-7998-4915-5 (http://services.igi-global.com/resolvedoi/resolve.aspx?doi=10.4018/978-1-7998-4915-5) Accessed: 18 November 2020

Shahzad MW, Burhan M, Ang L, Ng KC (2017) “Energy-water-environment nexus underpinning future desalination sustainability” Desalination (vol. 413, pp. 52–64) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.desal.2017.03.009

Bilgen S, Sarıkaya İ (2015) “Exergy for environment, ecology and sustainable development” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 51, pp. 1115–1131) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2015.07.015

Elsland R, Divrak C, Fleiter T, Wietschel M (2014) “Turkey’s Strategic Energy Efficiency Plan – An ex ante impact assessment of the residential sector” Energy Policy (vol. 70, pp. 14–29) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enpol.2014.03.010

Olafsson S, Cook D, Davidsdottir B, Johannsdottir L (2014) “Measuring countries׳ environmental sustainability performance – A review and case study of Iceland” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 39, pp. 934–948) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2014.07.101

Cucchiella F, D’Adamo I, Gastaldi M, Koh SL, Rosa P (2017) “A comparison of environmental and energetic performance of European countries: A sustainability index” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 78, pp. 401–413) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.04.077

Statistics, knowledge and policy: Key indicators to inform decision making (2005) Text Paris, France, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). (https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/economics/statistics-knowledge-and-policy_9789264009011-en) Accessed: 18 July 2021

De Bhowmick G, Sarmah AK, Sen R (2019) “Zero-waste algal biorefinery for bioenergy and biochar: A green leap towards achieving energy and environmental sustainability” Science of The Total Environment (vol. 650, pp. 2467–2482) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.10.002

Kaygusuz K (2009) “Energy and environmental issues relating to greenhouse gas emissions for sustainable development in Turkey” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 253–270) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2007.07.009

Özokcu S, Özdemir Ö (2017) “Economic growth, energy, and environmental Kuznets curve” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 72, pp. 639–647) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.01.059

Ferretti P, Zolin MB, Ferraro G (2020) “Relationships among sustainability dimensions: evidence from an Alpine area case study using Dominance-based Rough Set Approach” Land Use Policy (vol. 92, pp. 104457) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.landusepol.2019.104457

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Ludin GA, et al. (2017) “Afghanistan’s aspirations for energy independence: Water resources and hydropower energy” Renewable Energy (vol. 113, pp. 1276–1287) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2017.06.090

Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Ershad AM, Danish SMS, Yona A, et al. (2016) “Sustainable Architecture and Urban Planning trough Exploitation of Renewable Energy” International Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy (vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 1) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijrse.s.2017060301.11

Nance MT, Boettcher WA (2017) “Conflict, cooperation, and change in the politics of energy interdependence: An introduction” Energy Research & Social Science (vol. 24, pp. 1–5) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.erss.2016.12.020

Sovacool BK (2010) “The routledge handbook of energy security,” 1st ed. New York, USA, Routledge. 455 p. ISBN: 978-1-136-85063-9

Suck A (2005) “The politics for a sustainable energy industry: Renewable energy policy in the United Kingdom and in Germany,” 1st ed. Cheltenham, United Kingdom, Edward Elgar Publishing. p. ISBN: 978-1-84542-800-6 (https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781845423872.00016.xml) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Ludin GA, Yona A, et al. (2016) “An Open-door Immature Policy for Rural Electrification: A Case Study of Afghanistan” International Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy (vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 8–13) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijrse.s.2017060301.12

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article     Open Access      Published     
Sustaining energy systems using metal oxide composites as photocatalyst
Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Ibrahimi AM, Bhattacharya A, Nazari Z, Danish SMS, and Ahmadi M.
Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution (ISSN 2435-7251), 2021, 2 (1): 6-15  DOI 10.37357/1068/jser.2.1.02

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Among the various types of metal organic frameworks (MOFs), the metal-oxide-based ones fulfill all the essential criteria such as strong bonding, organic linking units, and highly crystalline nature, properties required to be effective photocatalysts to serve environmental remediation. Moreover, the even spread of active sites and semiconductor properties make the MOFs ideal for absorbing irradiation from UV as well as visible light sources. Metal oxide composites with carbon based materials, especially, show high photocatalytic activity toward the degradation of organic dyes. Considering the relatively low cost of metal oxide semiconductors compared to pure metallic nanoparticles, metal oxide composites can provide a great alternative as photocatalysts especially considering the adjustable bandgaps and synergistic effects. Therefore, the metal oxide application as the photocatalysts in industry and technology in terms of techno-economic advantage is attracted. In this study, energy sustainability and solving carbon-related issues through metal oxide-based materials are discussed. This study aims to review metal oxide composites including metal oxide-MOFs and metal oxide-carbon material compositions as photocatalysts, application, merits in environmental and energy systems performances, and its contribution as an influential factor for sustainable development.

 

PDF
Citation

 

 

 

 

 

Authors

Mir Sayed Shah Danish
Strategic Research Project Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Tomonobu Senjyu
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Abdul Matin Ibrahimi
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Arnab Bhattacharya
Department of Academic Affairs, Research and Education Promotion Association (REPA), Okinawa 900-0015, Japan

 

Zahra Nazari
Department of Computer Science, Kabul Polytechnic University, Kabul 1006, Afghanistan

 

Sayed Mir Shah Danish
Department of Electrical Engineering, Technical Teachers Training Academy (TTTA), Chihl Sutton, Kabul, Afghanistan

 

Mikaeel Ahmadi
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 
References

Emam HE, Ahmed HB, Gomaa E, Helal MH, Abdelhameed RM (2019) “Doping of silver vanadate and silver tungstate nanoparticles for enhancement the photocatalytic activity of MIL-125-NH2 in dye degradation” Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry (vol. 383, pp. 111986) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jphotochem.2019.111986
Zhang C, Ai L, Jiang J (2015) “Graphene hybridized photoactive iron terephthalate with enhanced photocatalytic activity for the degradation of rhodamine b under visible light” Ind Eng Chem Res (vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 153–163) https://doi.org/10.1021/ie504111y
Rad M, Dehghanpour S (2016) “ZnO as an efficient nucleating agent and morphology template for rapid, facile and scalable synthesis of MOF-46 and ZnO@MOF-46 with selective sensing properties and enhanced photocatalytic ability” RSC Adv (vol. 6, no. 66, pp. 61784–61793) https://doi.org/10.1039/C6RA12410K
Wang X, Liu J, Leong S, Lin X, Wei J, et al. (2016) “Rapid construction of ZnO@ZIF-8 heterostructures with size-selective photocatalysis properties” ACS Appl Mater Interfaces (vol. 8, no. 14, pp. 9080–9087) https://doi.org/10.1021/acsami.6b00028
Mahmoodi NM, Taghizadeh A, Taghizadeh M, Abdi J (2019) “In situ deposition of Ag/AgCl on the surface of magnetic metal-organic framework nanocomposite and its application for the visible-light photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine dye” Journal of Hazardous Materials (vol. 378, pp. 120741) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2019.06.018
Jiang D, Xu P, Wang H, Zeng G, Huang D, et al. (2018) “Strategies to improve metal organic frameworks photocatalyst’s performance for degradation of organic pollutants” Coordination Chemistry Reviews (vol. 376, pp. 449–466) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ccr.2018.08.005
Xie M-H, Shao R, Xi X-G, Hou G-H, Guan R-F, et al. (2017) “Metal–organic framework photosensitized TiO2 co-catalyst: A facile strategy to achieve a high efficiency photocatalytic system” Chemistry – A European Journal (vol. 23, no. 16, pp. 3931–3937) https://doi.org/10.1002/chem.201605282
Li H, Li Q, He Y, Zhang N, Xu Z, et al. (2018) “Facile fabrication of magnetic metal-organic framework composites for the highly selective removal of cationic dyes” Materials (vol. 11, no. 5, pp. 744) https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11050744
Zhao X, Liu S, Tang Z, Niu H, Cai Y, et al. (2015) “Synthesis of magnetic metal-organic framework (MOF) for efficient removal of organic dyes from water” Sci Rep (vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 11849) https://doi.org/10.1038/srep11849
Zhang M, Qiao R, Hu J (2020) “Engineering Metal–Organic Frameworks (MOFs) for Controlled Delivery of Physiological Gaseous Transmitters” Nanomaterials (vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 1134) https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10061134
Li Y, Zhou X, Dong L, Lai Y, Li S, et al. (2019) “Magnetic metal-organic frameworks nanocomposites for negligible-depletion solid-phase extraction of freely dissolved polyaromatic hydrocarbons” Environmental Pollution (vol. 252, pp. 1574–1581) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2019.04.137
Torretta V, Katsoyiannis IA, Viotti P, Rada EC (2018) “Critical review of the effects of glyphosate exposure to the environment and humans through the food supply chain” Sustainability (vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 950) https://doi.org/10.3390/su10040950
Danish MSS, Bhattacharya A, Stepanova D, Mikhaylov A, Grilli ML, et al. (2020) “A systematic review of metal oxide applications for energy and environmental sustainability” Metals (vol. 10, no. 12, pp. 1604) https://doi.org/10.3390/met10121604
Danish MSS, Estrella LL, Alemaida IMA, Lisin A, Moiseev N, et al. (2021) “Photocatalytic applications of metal oxides for sustainable environmental remediation” Metals (vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 80) https://doi.org/10.3390/met11010080
He X, Nguyen V, Jiang Z, Wang D, Zhu Z, et al. (2018) “Highly-oriented one-dimensional MOF-semiconductor nanoarrays for efficient photodegradation of antibiotics” Catal Sci Technol (vol. 8, no. 8, pp. 2117–2123) https://doi.org/10.1039/C8CY00229K
Moradi SE, Haji Shabani AM, Dadfarnia S, Emami S (2016) “Effective removal of ciprofloxacin from aqueous solutions using magnetic metal–organic framework sorbents: mechanisms, isotherms and kinetics” J IRAN CHEM SOC (vol. 13, no. 9, pp. 1617–1627) https://doi.org/10.1007/s13738-016-0878-y
Huo J-B, Xu L, Chen X, Zhang Y, Yang J-CE, et al. (2019) “Direct epitaxial synthesis of magnetic Fe3O4@UiO-66 composite for efficient removal of arsenate from water” Microporous and Mesoporous Materials (vol. 276, pp. 68–75) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.micromeso.2018.09.017
Ma Y, Xu G, Wei F, Cen Y, Xu X, et al. (2018) “One-pot synthesis of a magnetic, ratiometric fluorescent nanoprobe by encapsulating Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles and dual-emissive rhodamine b modified carbon dots in metal–organic framework for enhanced HClO sensing” ACS Appl Mater Interfaces (vol. 10, no. 24, pp. 20801–20805) https://doi.org/10.1021/acsami.8b05643
Gu C, Xiong S, Zhong Z, Wang Y, Xing W (2017) “A promising carbon fiber-based photocatalyst with hierarchical structure for dye degradation” RSC Adv (vol. 7, no. 36, pp. 22234–22242) https://doi.org/10.1039/C7RA02583A
Nekouei S, Nekouei F, Kargarzadeh H (2018) “Synthesis of ZnO photocatalyst modified with activated carbon for a perfect degradation of ciprofloxacin and its secondary pollutants” Applied Organometallic Chemistry (vol. 32, no. 3, pp. e4198) https://doi.org/10.1002/aoc.4198
Atchudan R, Edison TNJI, Perumal S, Karthik N, Karthikeyan D, et al. (2018) “Concurrent synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon dots for cell imaging and ZnO@nitrogen-doped carbon sheets for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue” Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology A: Chemistry (vol. 350, pp. 75–85) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jphotochem.2017.09.038
Wang F, Zhou Y, Pan X, Lu B, Huang J, et al. (2018) “Enhanced photocatalytic properties of ZnO nanorods by electrostatic self-assembly with reduced graphene oxide” Phys Chem Chem Phys (vol. 20, no. 10, pp. 6959–6969) https://doi.org/10.1039/C7CP06909J
Jo W-K, Kumar S, Isaacs MarkA, Lee AF, Karthikeyan S (2017) “Cobalt promoted TiO2/GO for the photocatalytic degradation of oxytetracycline and Congo Red” Applied Catalysis B: Environmental (vol. 201, pp. 159–168) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apcatb.2016.08.022
Ahmed B, Ojha AK, Singh A, Hirsch F, Fischer I, et al. (2018) “Well-controlled in-situ growth of 2D WO3 rectangular sheets on reduced graphene oxide with strong photocatalytic and antibacterial properties” Journal of Hazardous Materials (vol. 347, pp. 266–278) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2017.12.069
Gan L, Xu L, Shang S, Zhou X, Meng L (2016) “Visible light induced methylene blue dye degradation photo-catalyzed by WO3/graphene nanocomposites and the mechanism” Ceramics International (vol. 42, no. 14, pp. 15235–15241) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ceramint.2016.06.160
Taha AA, Li F (2014) “Porous WO3–carbon nanofibers: high-performance and recyclable visible light photocatalysis” Catal Sci Technol (vol. 4, no. 10, pp. 3601–3605) https://doi.org/10.1039/C4CY00777H
Song B, Wang T, Sun H, Shao Q, Zhao J, et al. (2017) “Two-step hydrothermally synthesized carbon nanodots/WO3 photocatalysts with enhanced photocatalytic performance” Dalton Trans (vol. 46, no. 45, pp. 15769–15777) https://doi.org/10.1039/C7DT03003G
Jeevitha G, Abhinayaa R, Mangalaraj D, Ponpandian N (2018) “Tungsten oxide-graphene oxide (WO3-GO) nanocomposite as an efficient photocatalyst, antibacterial and anticancer agent” Journal of Physics and Chemistry of Solids (vol. 116, pp. 137–147) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpcs.2018.01.021
Lee C-G, Javed H, Zhang D, Kim J-H, Westerhoff P, et al. (2018) “Porous electrospun fibers embedding TiO2 for adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of water pollutants” Environ Sci Technol (vol. 52, no. 7, pp. 4285–4293) https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.7b06508
Gong Q, Liu Y, Dang Z (2019) “Core-shell structured Fe3O4@GO@MIL-100(Fe) magnetic nanoparticles as heterogeneous photo-Fenton catalyst for 2,4-dichlorophenol degradation under visible light” J Hazard Mater (vol. 371, pp. 677–686) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2019.03.019
Liu G, Li L, Xu D, Huang X, Xu X, et al. (2017) “Metal–organic framework preparation using magnetic graphene oxide–β-cyclodextrin for neonicotinoid pesticide adsorption and removal” Carbohydrate Polymers (vol. 175, pp. 584–591) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.carbpol.2017.06.074
He R, Zhou J, Fu H, Zhang S, Jiang C (2018) “Room-temperature in situ fabrication of Bi2O3/g-C3N4 direct Z-scheme photocatalyst with enhanced photocatalytic activity” Applied Surface Science (vol. 430, pp. 273–282) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2017.07.191
Wu Y, Wang H, Tu W, Liu Y, Tan YZ, et al. (2018) “Quasi-polymeric construction of stable perovskite-type LaFeO3/g-C3N4 heterostructured photocatalyst for improved Z-scheme photocatalytic activity via solid p-n heterojunction interfacial effect” Journal of Hazardous Materials (vol. 347, pp. 412–422) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2018.01.025
Jain M, Yadav M, Kohout T, Lahtinen M, Garg VK, et al. (2018) “Development of iron oxide/activated carbon nanoparticle composite for the removal of Cr(VI), Cu(II) and Cd(II) ions from aqueous solution” Water Resources and Industry (vol. 20, pp. 54–74) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wri.2018.10.001
Guo X, Liu Q, Liu J, Zhang H, Yu J, et al. (2019) “Magnetic metal-organic frameworks/carbon dots as a multifunctional platform for detection and removal of uranium” Applied Surface Science (vol. 491, pp. 640–649) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2019.06.108
Romain AC, Nicolas J (2010) “Long term stability of metal oxide-based gas sensors for e-nose environmental applications: An overview” Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical (vol. 146, no. 2, pp. 502–506) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.snb.2009.12.027
Romain A-C, André Ph, Nicolas J (2002) “Three years experiment with the same tin oxide sensor arrays for the identification of malodorous sources in the environment” Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical (vol. 84, no. 2, pp. 271–277) https://doi.org/10.1016/S0925-4005(02)00036-9
Ionescu R, Vancu A, Tomescu A (2000) “Time-dependent humidity calibration for drift corrections in electronic noses equipped with SnO2 gas sensors” Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical (vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 283–286) https://doi.org/10.1016/S0925-4005(00)00508-6
Wang G, Yang Y, Han D, Li Y (2017) “Oxygen defective metal oxides for energy conversion and storage” Nano Today (vol. 13, pp. 23–39) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2017.02.009
O’Regan B, Grätzel M (1991) “A low-cost, high-efficiency solar cell based on dye-sensitized colloidal TiO 2 films” Nature (vol. 353, no. 6346, pp. 737–740) https://doi.org/10.1038/353737a0
Yang X, Wolcott A, Wang G, Sobo A, Fitzmorris RC, et al. (2009) “Nitrogen-doped ZnO nanowire arrays for photoelectrochemical water splitting” Nano Lett (vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 2331–2336) https://doi.org/10.1021/nl900772q
Hoang S, Guo S, Hahn NT, Bard AJ, Mullins CB (2012) “Visible light driven photoelectrochemical water oxidation on nitrogen-modified TiO2 nanowires” Nano Lett (vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 26–32) https://doi.org/10.1021/nl2028188
Kenney MJ, Gong M, Li Y, Wu JZ, Feng J, et al. (2013) “High-performance silicon photoanodes passivated with ultrathin nickel films for water oxidation” Science (vol. 342, no. 6160, pp. 836–840) https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1241327
Wang G, Wang H, Ling Y, Tang Y, Yang X, et al. (2011) “Hydrogen-treated TiO2 nanowire arrays for photoelectrochemical water splitting” Nano Lett (vol. 11, no. 7, pp. 3026–3033) https://doi.org/10.1021/nl201766h
Wang H, Qian F, Wang G, Jiao Y, He Z, et al. (2013) “Self-biased solar-microbial device for sustainable hydrogen generation” ACS Nano (vol. 7, no. 10, pp. 8728–8735) https://doi.org/10.1021/nn403082m
Yang Y, Ling Y, Wang G, Liu T, Wang F, et al. (2015) “Photohole induced corrosion of titanium dioxide: Mechanism and solutions” Nano Lett (vol. 15, no. 10, pp. 7051–7057) https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.nanolett.5b03114
Cheng L, Hou Y, Zhang B, Yang S, Guo JW, et al. (2013) “Hydrogen-treated commercial WO3 as an efficient electrocatalyst for triiodide reduction in dye-sensitized solar cells” Chem Commun (vol. 49, no. 53, pp. 5945–5947) https://doi.org/10.1039/C3CC42206B
Lu X, Yu M, Wang G, Zhai T, Xie S, et al. (2013) “H-TiO2@MnO2//H-TiO2@C core–shell nanowires for high prformance and flexible asymmetric supercapacitors” Advanced Materials (vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 267–272) https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201203410
Kang Q, Cao J, Zhang Y, Liu L, Xu H, et al. (2013) “Reduced TiO2 nanotube arrays for photoelectrochemical water splitting” J Mater Chem A (vol. 1, no. 18, pp. 5766–5774) https://doi.org/10.1039/C3TA10689F
Liang Z, Zheng G, Li W, Seh ZW, Yao H, et al. (2014) “Sulfur cathodes with hydrogen reduced titanium dioxide inverse opal structure” ACS Nano (vol. 8, no. 5, pp. 5249–5256) https://doi.org/10.1021/nn501308m
Tan H, Zhao Z, Niu M, Mao C, Cao D, et al. (2014) “A facile and versatile method for preparation of colored TiO2 with enhanced solar-driven photocatalytic activity” Nanoscale (vol. 6, no. 17, pp. 10216–10223) https://doi.org/10.1039/C4NR02677B
Ma D, Shi J-W, Zou Y, Fan Z, Ji X, et al. (2017) “Highly efficient photocatalyst based on a CdS quantum Dots/ZnO nanosheets 0D/2D heterojunction for hydrogen evolution from water splitting” ACS Appl Mater Interfaces (vol. 9, no. 30, pp. 25377–25386) https://doi.org/10.1021/acsami.7b08407
Lam DV, Won S, Shim HC, Kim J-H, Lee S-M (2019) “Turning cotton into tough energy textile via metal oxide assisted carbonization” Carbon (vol. 153, pp. 257–264) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.carbon.2019.07.010
Younis SA, Kwon EE, Qasim M, Kim K-H, Kim T, et al. (2020) “Metal-organic framework as a photocatalyst: Progress in modulation strategies and environmental/energy applications” Progress in Energy and Combustion Science (vol. 81, pp. 100870) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pecs.2020.100870
Li R, Wu S, Wan X, Xu H, Xiong Y (2016) “Cu/TiO2 octahedral-shell photocatalysts derived from metal–organic framework@semiconductor hybrid structures” Inorg Chem Front (vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 104–110) https://doi.org/10.1039/C5QI00205B
Kidanemariam A, Lee J, Park J (2019) “Recent innovation of metal-organic frameworks for carbon dioxide photocatalytic reduction” Polymers (vol. 11, no. 12, pp. 2090) https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11122090
Senanayake SD, Ramírez PJ, Waluyo I, Kundu S, Mudiyanselage K, et al. (2016) “Hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol on CeOx/Cu(111) and ZnO/Cu(111) catalysts: Role of the metal–oxide interface and importance of Ce3+ site” J Phys Chem C (vol. 120, no. 3, pp. 1778–1784) https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpcc.5b12012
Gao S, Lin Y, Jiao X, Sun Y, Luo Q, et al. (2016) “Partially oxidized atomic cobalt layers for carbon dioxide electroreduction to liquid fuel” Nature (vol. 529, no. 7584, pp. 68–71) https://doi.org/10.1038/nature16455
Humayun M, Qu Y, Raziq F, Yan R, Li Z, et al. (2016) “Exceptional visible-light activities of TiO2-coupled N-doped porous perovskite LaFeO3 for 2,4-dichlorophenol decomposition and CO2 conversion” Environ Sci Technol (vol. 50, no. 24, pp. 13600–13610) https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.6b04958

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article     Open Access      Published     
Smart and sustainable building appraisal
Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Nazari M, Zaheb H, Nassor TS, Danish SMS, and Karimy H.
Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution (ISSN 2435-7251), 2021, 2 (1): 1-5  DOI 10.37357/1068/jser.2.1.01

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

In general terms, energy efficiency and conservation appraisal aspire to deliver an insatiable energy demand with less energy within the most significant amount of conservation and environmental benefits at the lowest possible price. Sustainable planning and design rely on a series of multi-disciplines: technical, technological, social, political, environmental, ecological, economic, institutional, and global restrictions that abstruse viable decision-making. Recent reports indicate that the residential building sector consumes 40% of the total energy and emits 30% of greenhouse gas (GHGs) worldwide. Thus accordingly, energy consumption in buildings is estimated at one-third of total primary energy resources. Therefore, proper modeling and optimization of a sustainable building in terms of energy efficiency and saving become a matter of focus. This paper explores an emerging picture of influential factors in the context of hands-on roadmap for energy-efficient and smart city planners, practitioners, scholars, and researchers. This study reviews the main points and proposes a framework in detail in the upcoming studies. Meanwhile, another objective of this paper was to introduce the most crucial indicators of energy-efficient building planning, design, and optimization to draw an exhaustive roadmap in compliance with resiliency, sustainability, and efficiency criteria throughout the lifecycle of a sustainable building.

 

Citation

 

 

 

 

Authors

Mir Sayed Shah Danish
Strategic Research Project Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 9030213, Japan

 

Tomonobu Senjyu
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Masooma Nazari
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Alberta, Alberta T6G 2R3, Canada

 

Hameedullah Zaheb
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Thabit Salim Nassor
Department of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Karume Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Mbweni Road, Zanzibar, Tanzania

 

Sayed Mir Shah Danish
Department of Electrical Engineering, Technical Teachers Training Academy (TTTA), Chihl Sutton, Kabul, Afghanistan

 

Hedayatullah Karimy
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul 1006, Afghanistan

 

 
References

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Ibrahimi AM, Ahmadi M, Howlader AM (2019) “A managed framework for energy-efficient building” Journal of Building Engineering (vol. 21, pp. 120–128) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jobe.2018.10.013

Brenna M, Falvo MC, Foiadelli F, Martirano L, Poli D (2012) “Sustainable Energy Microsystem (SEM): preliminary energy analysis” 2012 IEEE PES Innovative Smart Grid Technologies (ISGT) Washington, DC, USA, IEEE - pp. 1–6. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISGT.2012.6175735 (http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/6175735/) Accessed: 3 February 2019

Bourdeau M, Zhai X qiang, Nefzaoui E, Guo X, Chatellier P (2019) “Modeling and forecasting building energy consumption: A review of data-driven techniques” Sustainable Cities and Society (vol. 48, pp. 101533) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scs.2019.101533

Nematchoua MK, Yvon A, Roy SEJ, Ralijaona CG, Mamiharijaona R, et al. (2019) “A review on energy consumption in the residential and commercial buildings located in tropical regions of Indian Ocean: A case of Madagascar island” Journal of Energy Storage (vol. 24, pp. 100748) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.est.2019.04.022

Kräuchi P, Dahinden C, Jurt D, Wouters V, Menti U-P, et al. (2017) “Electricity consumption of building automation” Energy Procedia (vol. 122, pp. 295–300) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egypro.2017.07.325

Kostyk T, Andrews CJ, Herkert J, Miller C (2011) “Energy and society: challenges ahead” 2011 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society (ISTAS) pp. 1–1. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISTAS.2011.7160603

Kundur P (2004) “Sustainable electric power systems in the 21st century: requirements, challenges and the role of new technologies” IEEE Power Engineering Society General Meeting, 2004. Denver, CO, USA, IEEE, vol. 2 - pp. 2298–2299. https://doi.org/10.1109/PES.2004.1373295 (http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/1373295/) Accessed: 3 February 2019

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Danish SMS, Sabory NR, K N, et al. (2019) “A Recap of Voltage Stability Indices in the Past Three Decades” Energies (vol. 12, no. 8, pp. 1544) https://doi.org/10.3390/en12081544

Danish MSS, Yona A, Senjyu T (2015) “A Review of Voltage Stability Assessment Techniques with an Improved Voltage Stability Indicator” International Journal of Emerging Electric Power Systems (vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 107–115) https://doi.org/10.1515/ijeeps-2014-0167

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Zaheb H, Sabory NR, Ibrahimi AM, et al. (2019) “A novel transdisciplinary paradigm for municipal solid waste to energy” Journal of Cleaner Production (vol. 233, pp. 880–892)

O’Neill-Carrillo E, Irizarry-Rivera AA, Colucci-Rios JA, Perez-Lugo M, Ortiz-Garcia C (2008) “Sustainable Energy: Balancing the Economic, Environmental and Social Dimensions of Energy” 2008 IEEE Energy 2030 Conference Atlanta, GA, USA, IEEE - pp. 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1109/ENERGY.2008.4781010 (http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/4781010/) Accessed: 21 July 2019

Putting energy efficiency first: consuming better, getting cleaner (2019) European Commission (http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_MEMO-16-3986_en.htm) Accessed: 21 July 2019

Akadiri PO, Chinyio EA, Olomolaiye PO (2012) “Design of A Sustainable Building: A Conceptual Framework for Implementing Sustainability in the Building Sector” Buildings (vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 126–152) https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings2020126

Dahunsi FM (2013) “Conceptual framework for sustainable energy development in Africa” 2013 IEEE International Conference on Emerging & Sustainable Technologies for Power & ICT in a Developing Society (NIGERCON) Owerri, Nigeria, IEEE - pp. 238–241. https://doi.org/10.1109/NIGERCON.2013.6715661 (http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/6715661/) Accessed: 21 July 2019

Gutiérrez Trashorras AJ, González-Caballín Sánchez JM, Álvarez Álvarez E, Paredes Sánchez JP (2015) “Certification of Energy Efficiency in New Buildings: A Comparison Among the Different Climatic Zones of Spain” IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications (vol. 51, no. 4, pp. 2726–2731) https://doi.org/10.1109/TIA.2015.2394374

Zheng S, Lam C-M, Hsu S-C, Ren J (2018) “Evaluating efficiency of energy conservation measures in energy service companies in China” Energy Policy (vol. 122, pp. 580–591) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enpol.2018.08.011

Farrow K, Grolleau G, Mzoughi N (2018) “Less is more in energy conservation and efficiency messaging” Energy Policy (vol. 122, pp. 1–6) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enpol.2018.07.007

Qian D, Li Y, Niu F, O’Neill Z (2019) “Nationwide savings analysis of energy conservation measures in buildings” Energy Conversion and Management (vol. 188, pp. 1–18) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enconman.2019.03.035

Fedorova E, Pongrácz E (2019) “Cumulative social effect assessment framework to evaluate the accumulation of social sustainability benefits of regional bioenergy value chains” Renewable Energy (vol. 131, pp. 1073–1088) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2018.07.070

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Ludin GA, et al. (2017) “Afghanistan’s aspirations for energy independence: Water resources and hydropower energy” Renewable Energy (vol. 113, pp. 1276–1287) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2017.06.090

Danish MSS, Matayoshi H, Howlader HOR, Chakraborty S, Mandal P, et al. (2019) “Microgrid Planning and Design: Resilience to Sustainability” Bangkok, Thailand, IEEE -

Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Ershad AM, Danish SMS, Yona A, et al. (2017) “Sustainable Architecture and Urban Planning trough Exploitation of Renewable Energy” International Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy (vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 1–7) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijrse.s.2017060301.11

Kim J-J, Rigdon B (1998) “Sustainable Architecture Module: Introduction to Sustainable Design” National Pollution Prevention Center for Higher Education (pp. 28)

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Zaheb H, Sabory NR, Ibrahimi AM, et al. (2019) “A Novel Transdisciplinary Paradigm for Solid Waste to Sustainable Energy” Journal of Cleaner Production (vol. (under review), )

Danish MSS, Zaheb H, Sabory NR, Karimy H, Faiq AB, et al. (2019) “The Road Ahead for Municipal Solid Waste Management in the 21st Century: A Novel-standardized Simulated Paradigm” The 3rd International Conference on Energy and Environmental Science 2019 (ICEES 2019) Seoul, South Korea, IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science (EES), vol. (in press) -

Jensen PA, Maslesa E, Berg JB, Thuesen C (2018) “10 questions concerning sustainable building renovation” Building and Environment (vol. 143, pp. 130–137) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2018.06.051

Shealy T (2016) “Do Sustainable Buildings Inspire More Sustainable Buildings?” Procedia Engineering (vol. 145, pp. 412–419) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2016.04.008

Oduyemi O, Okoroh M (2016) “Building performance modelling for sustainable building design” International Journal of Sustainable Built Environment (vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 461–469) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijsbe.2016.05.004

Díaz López C, Carpio M, Martín-Morales M, Zamorano M (2019) “A comparative analysis of sustainable building assessment methods” Sustainable Cities and Society (vol. 49, pp. 101611) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scs.2019.101611

Danish MSS, Yona A, Senjyu T (2014) “Pre-design and life cycle cost analysis of a hybrid power system for rural and remote communities in Afghanistan” The Journal of Engineering-IET (vol. 2014, no. 8, pp. 438–444) https://doi.org/10.1049/joe.2014.0172

Azhar S, Carlton WA, Olsen D, Ahmad I (2011) “Building information modeling for sustainable design and LEED® rating analysis” Automation in Construction (vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 217–224) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.autcon.2010.09.019

Humbert S, Abeck H, Bali N, Horvath A (n.d.) “Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) - A critical evaluation by LCA and recommendations for improvement” (pp. 18)

Danish MSS, Senjyu T (2019) “Green Building Efficiency and Sustainability Indicators” Green Building Management and Smart Automation , 1st ed. IGI Global, vol. (In press) - pp. 1–20.

Popovic T, Barbosa-Póvoa A, Kraslawski A, Carvalho A (2018) “Quantitative indicators for social sustainability assessment of supply chains” Journal of Cleaner Production (vol. 180, pp. 748–768) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.01.142

Tripathi V (2016) “A literature review of quantitative indicators to measure the quality of labor and delivery care” International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics (vol. 132, no. 2, pp. 139–145) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgo.2015.07.014

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article     Open Access      Published     
A review on environmental-friendly energy multidisciplinary exposition from goals to action
Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Faisal N, Stannikzai MZ, Nazari AM, and Vargas-Hernández JG.
Journal of Environmental Science Revolution (ISSN 2435-726X), 2021, 2 (1): 1-9  DOI 10.37357/1068/jesr.2.1.01

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

The world over-reliance on fossil fuels as a source of energy has led to a tremendous increase in environmental and climate change distresses. It has negatively impacted the ecosystem such that, if not checked, it will lead to dire consequences to the current population and jeopardize future generations’ well-being. The natural capital, being finite, can only sustain the world for several years. This paper analyses how technical, technological, economic, social, institutional, and political dimensions interact with sustainability. It also proposes the best approach to achieving sustainability goals proposed by the United Nations (UN). This empiric analysis paper relies on the literature review not analytical models. It comes up that there is no single methodology that will maintain sustainability requirements by 2030 independence, and every effort toward suitability needs specific measures of a unique nature. A multifaceted approach is ideal. It will take individuals, corporates, civil societies, non-state organizations, and governments to sustain sustainability significantly. All the above-listed dimensions influence environmental sustainability making it imperative to use relevant approaches in pursuing energy and environmental sustainability. Besides, cross-sector and intergovernmental methodologies are vital in achieving sustainable development. Therefore, this study focused on sustainability pillars expositions from lessons learned and examples, including political leadership, governance, policy, legislation, etc. That can influence sustainable development dimensions in achieving overall energy and environmental sustainability objectives. So, sustainability needs to be a global top priority list and executed as a matter of urgency.

 

Citation

 

 

 

 

 

Authors

Mir Sayed Shah Danish
Strategic Research Project Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Tomonobu Senjyu
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Nadeem Faisal
Central Institute of Petrochemicals Engineering and Technology, Centre for Skilling and Technical Support, Balasore, Odisha, India

 

Mohammad Zubair Stanikzai
Department of Academic Affairs, REPA—Research and Education Promotion Association, Okinawa, 900-0015, Japan

 

Abdul Malik Nazari
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul 1006, Afghanistan

 

José G. Vargas-Hernández6
University Center for Economic and Managerial Sciences, University of Guadalajara, 44100 Guadalajara, Jal., Mexico

References

Sioshansi F (2011) “Energy, sustainability and the environment,” 1st ed. Oxford, United Kingdom, Butterworth-Heinemann. 640 p. ISBN: 978-0-12-810376-0 (https://www.elsevier.com/books/energy-sustainability-and-the-environment/sioshansi/978-0-12-385136-9) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Statistics, knowledge and policy: Key indicators to inform decision making (2005) Text Paris, France, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). (https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/economics/statistics-knowledge-and-policy_9789264009011-en) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Schaltegger S, Hansen EG, Lüdeke-Freund F (2016) “Business models for sustainability: Origins, present research, and future avenues” Organization & Environment (vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 3–10) https://doi.org/10.1177/1086026615599806

Kaygusuz K (2009) “Energy and environmental issues relating to greenhouse gas emissions for sustainable development in Turkey” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 253–270) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2007.07.009

Pfister T, Schweighofer M, Reichel A (2016) “Sustainability,” 1st ed. CRC Press. 138 p. ISBN: 978-1-138-54635-6 (https://www.routledge.com/Sustainability/Pfister-Schweighofer-Reichel/p/book/9781138546356)

Zen AC, Lima A, Bianchi AL, Babot L (2012) “Sustainability, energy and development: A proposal of indicators” IJI (vol. 5, no. 1/2, pp. 537–541) https://doi.org/10.20533/iji.1742.4712.2012.0060

Cucchiella F, D’Adamo I, Gastaldi M, Koh SL, Rosa P (2017) “A comparison of environmental and energetic performance of European countries: A sustainability index” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 78, pp. 401–413) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.04.077

Urbaniec K, Mikulčić H, Rosen MA, Duić N (2017) “A holistic approach to sustainable development of energy, water and environment systems” Journal of Cleaner Production (vol. 155, pp. 1–11) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.01.119

De Bhowmick G, Sarmah AK, Sen R (2019) “Zero-waste algal biorefinery for bioenergy and biochar: A green leap towards achieving energy and environmental sustainability” Science of The Total Environment (vol. 650, pp. 2467–2482) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.10.002

Özokcu S, Özdemir Ö (2017) “Economic growth, energy, and environmental Kuznets curve” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 72, pp. 639–647) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.01.059

Ferretti P, Zolin MB, Ferraro G (2020) “Relationships among sustainability dimensions: evidence from an Alpine area case study using Dominance-based Rough Set Approach” Land Use Policy (vol. 92, pp. 104457) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.landusepol.2019.104457

Olafsson S, Cook D, Davidsdottir B, Johannsdottir L (2014) “Measuring countries׳ environmental sustainability performance – A review and case study of Iceland” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 39, pp. 934–948) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2014.07.101

Bilgen S, Sarıkaya İ (2015) “Exergy for environment, ecology and sustainable development” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 51, pp. 1115–1131) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2015.07.015

Owusu PA, Asumadu-Sarkodie S (2016) “A review of renewable energy sources, sustainability issues and climate change mitigation” Cogent Engineering (vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 1167990) https://doi.org/10.1080/23311916.2016.1167990

Rosen MA (2009) “Energy Sustainability: A Pragmatic Approach and Illustrations” Sustainability (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 55–80) https://doi.org/10.3390/su1010055

Kuzemko C, Lockwood M, Mitchell C, Hoggett R (2016) “Governing for sustainable energy system change: Politics, contexts and contingency” Energy Research & Social Science (vol. 12, pp. 96–105) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.erss.2015.12.022

Ginley DS, Cahen D: editors (2011) “Fundamentals of materials for energy and environmental sustainability” Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. 772 p. ISBN: 978-1-107-00023-0 (https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/fundamentals-of-materials-for-energy-and-environmental-sustainability/00F3ED3E477624B8941118E99A393B7C) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Ershad AM, Danish SMS, Yona A, et al. (2016) “Sustainable Architecture and Urban Planning trough Exploitation of Renewable Energy” International Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy (vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 1) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijrse.s.2017060301.11

U.S. Department of Energy (2021) “Office of fossil energy and carbon management” Education (https://www.energy.gov/fe/about-us/students-and-teachers) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Buxton G (2020) “Alternative energy technologies: An introduction with computer simulations,” 1st ed. Boca Raton London New York, CRC Press. 302 p. ISBN: 978-0-367-65638-6

Philander G: editor (2012) “Encyclopedia of global warming and climate change,” 2nd ed. Thousand Oaks, Calif, SAGE Publications, Inc. 1720 p. ISBN: 978-1-4129-9261-9

Nathanson JA (n.d.) “Air pollution” Encyclopedia Britannica (https://www.britannica.com/science/air-pollution) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Ritchie H, Roser M (2020) “Environmental impacts of food production” Our World in Data (https://ourworldindata.org/environmental-impacts-of-food) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Qazi A, Hussain F, Rahim NABD, Hardaker G, Alghazzawi D, et al. (2019) “Towards Sustainable Energy: A Systematic Review of Renewable Energy Sources, Technologies, and Public Opinions” IEEE Access (vol. 7, pp. 63837–63851) https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2019.2906402

Nizam HA, Zaman K, Khan KB, Batool R, Khurshid MA, et al. (2020) “Achieving environmental sustainability through information technology: ‘Digital Pakistan’ initiative for green development” Environ Sci Pollut Res (vol. 27, no. 9, pp. 10011–10026) https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-020-07683-x

Council of Academies of Engineering and Technological Sciences (1995) “The role of technology in environmentally sustainable development: A declaration of the council of academies of engineering and technological sciences,” 1st ed. Royal Academy of Engineering. (https://books.google.com/books/about/The_Role_of_Technology_in_Environmentall.html?id=IikrAAAAYAAJ) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Bhowmik A, Dahekar RM (2014) “Green technology for sustainable urban life” Recent Research in Science and Technology (vol. 6, pp. 4–8)

Mairal D (2015) “The economic dimension of sustainability” Aragon Valley (http://www.aragonvalley.com/en/economic-dimension-sustainability/) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Basiago AD (1998) “Economic, social, and environmental sustainability in development theory and urban planning practice” The Environmentalist (vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 145–161) https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1006697118620

Pettinger T (2019) “Key measures of economic performance” Economics Help (https://www.economicshelp.org/blog/10189/economics/key-measures-economic-performance/) Accessed: 18 July 2021

World economic situation and prospects 2020 (2020) New York, USA, UNCTAD. (https://unctad.org/webflyer/world-economic-situation-and-prospects-2020) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Common M, Stagl S (2005) “Ecological economics: An introduction,” Illustrated edition Cambridge, UK ; New York, Cambridge University Press. 594 p. ISBN: 978-0-521-01670-4

Bascom CR (2016) “From economic growth to sustainable development” Medium (https://sustainabilityx.co/economic-growth-to-sustainable-development-5d441e9a595e) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Higgins KL (2013) “Economic growth and sustainability – are they mutually exclusive?” Elsevier Connect (https://www.elsevier.com/connect/economic-growth-and-sustainability-are-they-mutually-exclusive) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Samimi A, Ghaderi S, Ahmadpour M (2011) “Environmental sustainability and economic growth: Evidence from some developing countries” Advances in Environmental Biology (vol. 5, pp. 961–966)

Kokic Arsic A, Mišić M, Radojković M, Prlinčević B (2016) “social aspects of sustainable development of enterprises” Kragujevac, Serbia, University of Kragujevac Rectorate - pp. 83–88.

Prescott-Allen R (2001) “The wellbeing of nations : a country-by-country index of quality of life and the environment,” 1st ed. Washington, DC, USA, Island Press. 342 p. ISBN: 978-1-55963-830-2 (https://portals.iucn.org/library/node/7942) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Ajmal MM, Khan M, Hussain M, Helo P (2018) “Conceptualizing and incorporating social sustainability in the business world” International Journal of Sustainable Development & World Ecology (vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 327–339) https://doi.org/10.1080/13504509.2017.1408714

O’Riordan T, Voisey H (1997) “The political economy of sustainable development” Environmental Politics (vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 1–23) https://doi.org/10.1080/09644019708414309

UN Sustainable Development (2021) “Future we want - Outcome document” Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform (https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/index.php?menu=1298) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Tilman A, Lütkenhorst W (2015) “Industrial policy in developing countries: failing markets, weak states,” 1st ed. Cheltenham, United Kingdom, Edward Elgar Publishing. 232 p. ISBN: 978-1-78100-025-0 (https://www.die-gdi.de/en/books/article/industrial-policy-in-developing-countries-failing-markets-weak-states/) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Krueger AO (1974) “The political economy of the rent-seeking society” The American Economic Review (vol. 64, no. 3, pp. 291–303)

UN Sustainable Development (2021) “A/RES/66/288 - Institutional framework for sustainable development” Sustainable development knowledge platform (https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/index.php?page=view&type=2002&nr=31&menu=35) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Elobeid D (2012) “The role of institutions in sustainable development: The experience of Sudan economy” SSRN Scholarly Paper Rochester, NY, Social Science Research Network. (https://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2073875) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Du Pisani JA (2006) “Sustainable development – historical roots of the concept” Environmental Sciences (vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 83–96) https://doi.org/10.1080/15693430600688831

The World Energy Foundation (2014) “A Brief History of Sustainability – The World Energy Foundation” (https://theworldenergyfoundation.org/a-brief-history-of-sustainability) Accessed: 18 July 2021

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article     Open Access      Published     
Developing nations as a foremost allotment for achieving 2030 SDGs – A case study
Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Urasaki N, Rahmany NA, Ershad AM, Sabory NR, Zarabie AK, Anwarzai MA, Karimy H, and Zaheb H.
Journal of Engineering and Technology Revolution (ISSN 2435-7278), 2021, 2 (1): 1-10  DOI 10.37357/1068/jetr.2.1.01

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Afghanistan endows enormous renewable and nonrenewable resources as a primary impetus for development of energy and agriculture. The percentage of the population whose access to the essential daily necessities for having a healthy life is among the lowest in the world. This dilemma chiefly refers to the rural and remote communities in Afghanistan. In terms of rural societies, sustainable development is a decision-making strategy that balances social, economic, technical, institutional, and environmental aspects that assures the present needs of humankind, considering the future anticipation simultaneously. The concept developed in this study targets achieving the 2030 sustainable development goals (SDGs), which are appropriate for rural and remote residents’ lifestyle change and improvement in Afghanistan. Setting measurable sustainability indicators is indispensable for the productive invention of a sustained plane for a sustainable rural community. This study proposes a sustainable mechanism for Afghanistan's rural development by confirming the 2030 sustainable development 17 Goals (SDGs). Among these SDGs, the designed framework (methodology) meets 11 goals directly and the rest of 6 goals indirectly.  Besides, the proposed framework propounds a novel solution and involves all crucial segments of routine healthy life in rural Afghanistan. It consecrated criteria that fit the real-life anticipations and can lead the rural communities toward self-sufficiency for long-run sustainability.  Based on the academic research and experts' judgment methods, overall analysis procedures can fit as an analogy, especially for other communities and developing countries as a pilot project.

 

Citation

 

 

 

 

Authors

Mir Sayed Shah Danish
Strategic Research Project Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul 1006, Afghanistan

 

Tomonobu Senjyu
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Naomitsu Urasaki
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Nisar Ahmad Rahmany
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul 1006, Afghanistan

 

Ahmad Murtaza Ershad
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul 1006, Afghanistan

 

Najib Rahman Sabory
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul 1006, Afghanistan

 

Ahmad Khaled Zarabie
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul 1006, Afghanistan

 

Mohammad Abed Anwarzai
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul 1006, Afghanistan

 

Hedayatullah Karimy
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul 1006, Afghanistan

 

Hameedullah Zaheb
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul 1006, Afghanistan

References

The science and technology research partnership for sustainable development (SATREPS) project outcomes for the 2030 sustainable development goals (SDGs) (2018) Tokyo, Japan, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). (https://www.jst.go.jp/global/english/public/shiryo/re_satreps_eng.pdf) Accessed: 17 July 2019

Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Ludin GA, Yona A, et al. (2016) “An Open-door Immature Policy for Rural Electrification: A Case Study of Afghanistan” International Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy (vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 8–13) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijrse.s.2017060301.12

Danish MSS, Yona A, Senjyu T (2014) “Pre-design and life cycle cost analysis of a hybrid power system for rural and remote communities in Afghanistan” The Journal of Engineering-IET (vol. 2014, no. 8, pp. 438–444) https://doi.org/10.1049/joe.2014.0172

Sediqi A (2010) “A preliminary assessment of air quality in Kabul” Kabul, Afghanistan, Ministry of Mines. (https://www.afghan-web.com/docs/kabul_air_quality.pdf)

Danish MSS, Zaheb H, Sabory NR, Karimy H, Faiq AB, et al. (2019) “The Road Ahead for Municipal Solid Waste Management in the 21st Century: A Novel-standardized Simulated Paradigm” IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science IOP Publishing, vol. 291 - pp. 1–5. https://doi.org/10.1088/1755-1315/291/1/012009

The Paris Agreement (2018) United Naitons: Climate Change (https://unfccc.int/process-and-meetings/the-paris-agreement/the-paris-agreement) Accessed: 17 July 2019

United Nations Treaty Collection: Environemnt (2015) Paris, France. (https://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=IND&mtdsg_no=XXVII-7-d&chapter=27&clang=_en) Accessed: 17 July 2019

-WS-Afghanistan-sign (2015) (https://treaties.un.org/doc/Treaties/2016/02/2016021506-03PM/Actions/1461693282115-WS-Afghanistan-sign.jpg) Accessed: 22 July 2021

Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Ershad AM, Danish SMS, Ohta R, et al. (2017) “The Least Developed Countries Need for Changing the Passive Trend of Renewable Energy Exploitation to a Proactive Trend” International Journal of Energy and Power Engineering (vol. 5, no. 6, pp. 215–221) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijepe.20160506.17

Waas T, Hugé J, Block T, Wright T, Benitez-Capistros F, et al. (2014) “Sustainability Assessment and Indicators: Tools in a Decision-Making Strategy for Sustainable Development” Sustainability (vol. 6, no. 9, pp. 5512–5534) https://doi.org/10.3390/su6095512

Brenna M, Falvo MC, Foiadelli F, Martirano L, Poli D (2012) “Sustainable Energy Microsystem (SEM): preliminary energy analysis” 2012 IEEE PES Innovative Smart Grid Technologies (ISGT) Washington, DC, USA, IEEE - pp. 1–6. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISGT.2012.6175735 (http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/6175735/) Accessed: 3 February 2019

Liu M (Max), Mi B (2017) “Life cycle cost analysis of energy-efficient buildings subjected to earthquakes” Energy and Buildings (vol. 154, pp. 581–589) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2017.08.056

Corral L, Reardon T (2001) “Rural Nonfarm Incomes in Nicaragua” World Development (vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 427–442) https://doi.org/10.1016/S0305-750X(00)00109-1

Coeymans J, Mundlak Y (1993) “Sectoral growth in Chile: 1962-82” Research reports International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). (https://econpapers.repec.org/paper/fprresrep/95.htm) Accessed: 23 July 2021

Poornachandra Rao GVS, Bhalla MS (1981) “Palaeomagnetism of Dhar traps and drift of the subcontinent during the Deccan volcanism” Geophysical Journal International (vol. 65, no. 1, pp. 155–164) https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-246X.1981.tb02705.x

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Ludin GA, et al. (2017) “Afghanistan’s aspirations for energy independence: Water resources and hydropower energy” Renewable Energy (vol. 113, pp. 1276–1287) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2017.06.090

Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Ershad AM, Danish SMS, Yona A, et al. (2016) “Sustainable Architecture and Urban Planning trough Exploitation of Renewable Energy” International Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy (vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 1) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijrse.s.2017060301.11

Frame D, Tembo K, Dolan MJ, Strachan SM, Ault GW (2011) “A community based approach for sustainable off-grid PV systems in developing countries” 2011 IEEE Power and Energy Society General Meeting Detroit, MI, USA, IEEE - pp. 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1109/PES.2011.6039593 (http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/6039593/) Accessed: 3 February 2019

Cucchiella F, D’Adamo I, Gastaldi M, Koh SL, Rosa P (2017) “A comparison of environmental and energetic perfor mance of European countries: A sustainability index” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 78, pp. 401–413) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.04.077

Nilep C (2009) “Sibling interaction and symbolic capital: Toward a theory of political micro-economy” Journal of Pragmatics (vol. 41, no. 9, pp. 1683–1692) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2009.02.005

Cleaner production as an antecedent for circular economy paradigm shift at the micro-level: Evidence from a home appliance manufacturer (2018) Journal of Cleaner Production (vol. 185, pp. 740–748) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.03.006

Burns RK (2011) “Afghanistan: Solar assets, electricity production, and rural energy factors” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 2144–2148) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2010.12.002

Rosen MA (2009) “Energy Sustainability: A Pragmatic Approach and Illustrations” Sustainability (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 55–80) https://doi.org/10.3390/su1010055

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Zaheb H, Sabory NR, Ibrahimi AM, et al. (2019) “A novel transdisciplinary paradigm for municipal solid waste to energy” Journal of Cleaner Production (vol. 233, pp. 880–892)

Ilek A, Rozenshtrom I (2018) “The term premium in a small open economy: A micro-founded approach” International Review of Economics & Finance (vol. 57, pp. 333–352) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.iref.2018.02.002

Dobbelaere S, Kozo K, Mairesse J (2012) “Product and Labor Market Imperfections and Scale Economies: Micro-evidence on France, Japan and the Netherlands” CREST (ParisTech-ENSAE), UNU-MERIT (Maastricht University) and National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) (pp. 26)

Figueiredo PN (2017) “Micro-level technological capability accumulation in developing economies: Insights from the Brazilian sugarcane ethanol industry” Journal of Cleaner Production (vol. 167, pp. 416–431) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.08.201

Gardner BL (2005) “Causes of rural economic development” Agricultural Economics (vol. 32, no. s1, pp. 21–41) https://doi.org/10.1111/j.0169-5150.2004.00012.x

Luederitz C, Abson DJ, Audet R, Lang DJ (2017) “Many pathways toward sustainability: Not conflict but co-learning between transition narratives” Sustainability Science (vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 393–407) https://doi.org/10.1007/s11625-016-0414-0

Kostyk T, Andrews CJ, Herkert J, Miller C (2011) “Energy and society: challenges ahead” 2011 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society (ISTAS) pp. 1–1. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISTAS.2011.7160603

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article     Open Access      Published     
Society empowerment by sustaining volunteerism culture
Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Tayarani SM, Marasigan MAJ, Zaheb H, Gebarowska A, and Grilli ML.
Journal of Business and Management Revolution, 2021, 2 (1): 1-9  DOI 10.37357/1068/jbmr/2.1.01

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

This study interrogates the role of volunteers in society empowerment to enable students with a broad view of volunteerism as a first action. This study aims to encourage volunteer research, education, and social activities at the undergraduate and graduate students' levels.  At first sight, significant workforce needs exist in educational research and studies, while only a small percentage of students volunteer their services. Consequently, many students miss the opportunity to give back to the community and excel in their academic and career assets in the long run. The analysis exposed that students are the first beneficially in unique ways if they volunteer in research and education. It is also observed that research immensely impacts learning, and knowledge positively influences society. Therefore, by implication, volunteer activities in research and education will benefit young volunteers and communities. Besides, volunteer opportunities are readily available to students. Also, conducting volunteer activities has been impactful on the overall performance rating. A volunteer should train and learn best practices and behavior. It will promote educational research, student success and improve livelihood in the community. In conclusion, this study reveals that volunteering in the field of education and research is critically important for students to participate in volunteer activities.

 

Citation

 

 

 

 

Authors

Mir Sayed Shah Danish
Strategic Research Project Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Tomonobu Senjyu
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Seyedeh Maryam Tayarani
Department of Academic Affairs, Research and Education Promotion Association (REPA), Okinawa 900-0015, Japan

 

Michell Ann Julieth Marasigan
Liaison Office, Research and Education Promotion Association (REPA), Okinawa 900-0015, Japan

 

Hameedullah Zaheb
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Alexandra Gebarowska
Department of Academic Affairs, Research and Education Promotion Association (REPA), Okinawa 900-0015, Japan

 

Maria Luisa Grilli
Department of Energy Technologies and Renewable Sources, Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), Casaccia Research Centre, 00123 Rome, Italy

References

Nathan C. Manual on volunteer services in public welfare. Washington: Dept. of Health Education, and Welfare, Social and Rehabilitation Service; 1972.

Volunteering in the United States News Release [Internet]. Bls.gov. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/volun_02252016.htm

Bentson M. Volunteer Coordinator Handbook for Volunteer Programs Teaching Esl to Refugee Students. Tacoma Community House Training Project; 1983.

Packham C. The Role of Youth and Community Work Training in Relation to Volunteers. 2008.

Brennan M. Placing Volunteers at the Center of Community Development [Internet]. Semanticscholar.org. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Placing-Volunteers-at-the-Center-of-Community-Brennan/9dce9cfdd3fac09e135aadb29cd4e9abd7806100

Douglas P, Ryan T, Beller G, Hines E, Livingston D, McEntee C et al. Task Force 6: Code of Conduct for Staff and Volunteer Leadership. Circulation. 2004; 110 (16):2538-2549.

ATLANTIS PRESS. Fostering Voluntarism in Digital Age [Internet]. 2019. Available from: https://download.atlantis-press.com/proceedings/acec-19/125937433

Hall-Ellis S, Grealy D. [Internet]. Pdfs.semanticscholar.org. 2013 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: ttps://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/d41d/32a3239a7a4d43475e9744206787e697bf59.pdf

Benefits of Performing Community Service in College [Internet]. Great Value Colleges. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.greatvaluecolleges.net/lists/5-benefits-of-performing-community-service-in-college/

HuffPost is now a part of Verizon Media [Internet]. Huffpost.com. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.huffpost.com/entry/middle-school-grades-volunteering_n_56293e48e4b0aac0b8fc3508

Volunteering Produces Health Benefits - AmeriCorps Alums [Internet]. Americorpsalums.org. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.americorpsalums.org/page/LNVolunteerHealth

Benefits of Community Service | Community Engagement [Internet]. Wcsu.edu. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.wcsu.edu/community-engagement/benefits-of-volunteering/

How To Combat Barriers To Volunteering In 2019 [Internet]. Third Sector Protect. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.thirdsectorprotect.co.uk/blog/barriers-to-volunteering/

Volunteer Opportunities for College Students [Internet]. Vault. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.vault.com/blogs/admit-one-vaults-mba-law-school-and-college-blog/7-volunteer-opportunities-for-college-students

Hunter E. Voluntarism, Virtuous Citizenship, and Nation-Building in Late Colonial and Early Postcolonial Tanzania. African Studies Review. 2015; 58 (2):48-49.

The Impact of Research on Education on JSTOR [Internet]. Jstor.org. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.jstor.org/stable/20495397?read-now=1&seq=6#page_scan_tab_contents

Active Involvement of Volunteers [Internet]. Uniteforsight.org. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: http://www.uniteforsight.org/effective-program-development/module8

Suaedy A. The Role of Volunteers and Political Participation in the 2012 Jakarta Gubernatorial Election. Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs. 2014;33 (1):125-133.

Project B. The Top 10 Effects Education Has on Society | The Borgen Project [Internet]. The Borgen Project. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://borgenproject.org/effects-education-has-on-society/#:~:text=Educationleadstoeconomicprosperity,soldontheopenmarket.

Various Approaches for Educational Research | K12 Academics [Internet]. K12academics.com. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.k12academics.com/educational-research/approaches

[Internet]. Vsointernational.org. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.vsointernational.org/sites/default/files/the_role_of_volunteering_in_sustainable_development_2015_vso_ids.pdf

Morris M. Voluntary work in the welfare state. London: Routledge; 1998.

Characteristics That Every Great Volunteer Has In Common [Internet]. AIESEC. 2020 [cited 24 July 2020]. Available from: https://www.aiesec.in/characteristics-every-great-volunteer-common

Kolnhofer Derecskei, A., & Nagy, V. (2020). Employee Volunteerism—Conceptual Study and the Current Situation. Sustainability, 12(20), 8378. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208378

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article     Open Access      Published     
Afghanistan aquaculture and fishery sectors – A foresight outlooks
Danish MSS, Ibrahimi AM, Yaqobi MA, Udagawa S, Mikhaylov A, Faisal N, and Senjyu T.
Journal of Ecoscience and Plant Revolution, 2021, 2 (1): 17-37  DOI 10.37357/1068/jser.2.1.03

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Aquaculture systems and technologies are growing industries in many countries with high environmental and socio-economic advantages. Afghanistan, a landlocked country in South Asia with diverse geographic and ecological features, reported the lowest fish consumption rate (just above 2 kg per capita). After conflicts and instability in Afghanistan, aquaculture and fisheries sectors revived slowly, followed by a rapid production and demand increase in the last four years. However, Afghanistan can demonstrate with a long history of fishery and agriculture productions in the past, but the post-conflict and stability efforts are minimal. Therefore, Afghanistan's aquaculture and fisheries sectors are conventional and require more effort to study and propose viable solutions aligned with today’s technological and sustainability requirements. Adequate and historically documented information about Afghanistan's aquaculture and fisheries activities are pretty limited. This study covers previous aquaculture initiatives, establishes a thematic review of the current situation based on little available information, and follows by a foresight outlook of the future trends.  Besides, it presents the essential factors associated with production-efficient aquaculture and fishery systems in light of economic and production performance indicators. These indicators are briefly discussed that contribute to system planners and practitioners in decision-making and optimizing economic and operational efficiencies. Besides of studying Afghanistan aquaculture and fishery sectors, the basic criteria for successful small scale aquaculture are also presented that can be counted as one of the recent compositions of the subject in terms of scholarly managed information within an exhaustive insight.

PDF
Citation

 

 

 

 

Authors

Mir Sayed Shah Danish
Strategic Research Project Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Abdul Matin Ibrahimi
Strategic Research Project Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Mohammad Aman Yaqobi
Strategic Research Project Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Shingo Udagawa
Strategic Research Project Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

 

Alexey Mikhaylov
Financial University under the Government of the Russian Federation, Moscow 125167, Russia

 

Nadeem Faisal
Central Institute of Petrochemicals Engineering and Technology, Centre for Skilling and Technical Support, Balasore, Odisha, India

 

Tomonobu Senjyu
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan

References

QU Dongyu (2016) “FAO corporate video” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ub6N8aWThw4&t=58s) Accessed: 27 April 2021

Danish MSS, Matayoshi H, Howlader HOR, Chakraborty S, Mandal P, et al. (2019) “Microgrid Planning and Design: Resilience to Sustainability” 2019 IEEE PES GTD Grand International Conference and Exposition Asia (GTD Asia) Bangkok, Thailand, IEEE - pp. 253–258. https://doi.org/10.1109/GTDAsia.2019.8716010 (https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8716010/) Accessed: 28 September 2019

Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Ershad AM, Danish SMS, Ohta R, et al. (2017) “The Least Developed Countries Need for Changing the Passive Trend of Renewable Energy Exploitation to a Proactive Trend” International Journal of Energy and Power Engineering (vol. 5, no. 6, pp. 215–221) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijepe.20160506.17

O’Neill-Carrillo E, Irizarry-Rivera AA, Colucci-Rios JA, Perez-Lugo M, Ortiz-Garcia C (2008) “Sustainable Energy: Balancing the Economic, Environmental and Social Dimensions of Energy” 2008 IEEE Energy 2030 Conference Atlanta, GA, USA, IEEE - pp. 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1109/ENERGY.2008.4781010 (http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/4781010/) Accessed: 21 July 2019

Brundtland G (1987) “Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development: Our Common Future” New York, USA, United Nations (UN). (https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/5987our-common-future.pdf)

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Ibrahimi AM, Ahmadi M, Howlader AM (2019) “A managed framework for energy-efficient building” Journal of Building Engineering (vol. 21, pp. 120–128) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jobe.2018.10.013

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Ludin GA, et al. (2017) “Afghanistan’s aspirations for energy independence: Water resources and hydropower energy” Renewable Energy (vol. 113, pp. 1276–1287) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2017.06.090

Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Ershad AM, Danish SMS, Yona A, et al. (2016) “Sustainable Architecture and Urban Planning trough Exploitation of Renewable Energy” International Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy (vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 1) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijrse.s.2017060301.11

Coad B: editor (2014) “Fishes of Afghanistan,” 1st ed. Enabled, Pensoft. 389 p. ISBN: 954-642-752-7

Pandey VL, Mahendra Dev S, Jayachandran U (2016) “Impact of agricultural interventions on the nutritional status in South Asia: A review” Food Policy (vol. 62, pp. 28–40) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.05.002

Stobutzki IC, Silvestre GT, Garces LR (2006) “Key issues in coastal fisheries in South and Southeast Asia, outcomes of a regional initiative” Fisheries Research (vol. 78, no. 2–3, pp. 109–118) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fishres.2006.02.002

Nash CE (2011) “The history of aquaculture,” 1st ed. Ames, Iowa, Wiley-Blackwell. 227 p. ISBN: 978-0-8138-2163-4

Samuel-Fitwi B, Wuertz S, Schroeder JP, Schulz C (2012) “Sustainability assessment tools to support aquaculture development” Journal of Cleaner Production (vol. 32, pp. 183–192) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2012.03.037

FAO (2020) “The state of world fisheries and aquaculture 2020: Sustainability in action,” 1st ed. Rome, Italy, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). 244 p. ISBN: 978-92-5-132692-3 (http://www.fao.org/documents/card/en/c/ca9229en/) Accessed: 22 April 2021

Levis JW, Weisbrod A, Van Hoof G, Barlaz MA (2017) “A review of the airborne and waterborne emissions from uncontrolled solid waste disposal sites” Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology (vol. 47, no. 12, pp. 1003–1041) https://doi.org/10.1080/10643389.2017.1342513

United Nations (UN) (2020) “The17 Goals: Sustainable development” Department of Economic and Social Affairs - UN (https://sdgs.un.org/goals) Accessed: 22 April 2021

Sustainable aquaculture (2021) Better Fish Farming (https://www.betterfishfarming.org/) Accessed: 22 April 2021

Cai J, Zhou X, Yan X, Lucente D, Lagana C (2019) “Top 10 species groups in global aquaculture 2017” Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (pp. 12)

Idayzone (2017) “Qargha lake” IDAYZONE (https://idayzone.wordpress.com/2017/10/03/qargha-lake/) Accessed: 30 April 2021

FAO (2017) “Taming the waters of Afghanistan” Detail video, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (http://www.fao.org/news/audio-video/detail-video/en/c/12197/?uid=12197) Accessed: 27 April 2021

Funge-Smith S, Yousafzai KR, Durani HLM, Salimi HLM, Rahman S, et al. (2008) “The Potential for Aquaculture Development in Afghanistan” Asia Pacific Fishery Commission AD HOC Publicaiton (pp. 1–38)

Xinhuanet (2019) “Fish farming booms in S. Afghan province” Asia and Pasific (http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-07/14/c_138225783.htm) Accessed: 25 April 2021

Afghan Trout Fish Farm (2018) “New arrived fish to Kabul” (https://www.facebook.com/426690291080164/photos/a.426728447743015/433807987035061/) Accessed: 27 April 2021

Ahmadzai B (2017) “Fish value chain analysis and fisheries sector development opportunities: Afghanistan” Technical Report Kabul, Afghanistan, Ministry of Agriculture Irrigation and Livestock (MAIL), Afghanistan. (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/316985997_Fish_Value_Chain_Analysis_and_Fisheries_Sector_Development_Opportunities-Afghanistan) Accessed: 21 April 2021

List of freshwater fish of Afghanistan (2021) Mongabay (http://www.mongabay.com/data/Afghanistan.htm) Accessed: 28 April 2021

List of freshwater fishes reported from Afghanistan (2021) FishBase (https://www.fishbase.de/country/CountryChecklist.php?showAll=yes&what=list&trpp=50&c_code=004&cpresence=Reported&sortby=alpha2&ext_CL=on&ext_pic=on&vhabitat=fresh) Accessed: 26 April 2021

Pariona A (2019) “Native fish of Afghanistan” WorldAtlas (https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/native-fish-of-afghanistan.html) Accessed: 24 April 2021

FAO: editor (2018) “The state of world fisheries and aquaculture 2018 - Meeting the sustainable development goals,” 1st ed. Rome, Italy, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). 210 p. ISBN: 978-92-5-130562-1

Shahed (2020) “Fish farming in Afghanistan, six months waiting for harvesting” Shahed News (https://shahed.news/2020/09/پرورش-ماهی-در-افغانستان،-۶-ماه-انتظار-ب/) Accessed: 29 April 2021

Partoopars Fish Farm (2021) “Afghan fish kabab (1)” (https://www.facebook.com/farmahi.partoopars/photos/pcb.893299511426341/893299354759690) Accessed: 30 April 2021

Partoopars Fish Farm (2021) “Afghan fish kabab (2)” (https://www.facebook.com/farmahi.partoopars/photos/pcb.893299511426341/893299391426353) Accessed: 30 April 2021

Partoopars Fish Farm (2021) “Salmon species fish in Afghanistan” (https://www.facebook.com/farmahi.partoopars/photos/pcb.765796457509981/765796047510022) Accessed: 30 April 2021

Partoopars Fish Farm (2021) “Salmon fish kabak” (https://www.facebook.com/farmahi.partoopars/photos/pcb.765796457509981/765796330843327) Accessed: 30 April 2021

Partoopars Fish Farm (2021) “Salmon fish ready for kabak” (https://www.facebook.com/farmahi.partoopars/photos/pcb.765796457509981/765795984176695) Accessed: 30 April 2021

FAO (2021) “Fishery and aquaculture country profiles: The Islamic Republic of Afghanistan” Fisheries Division - FAO (http://www.fao.org/fishery/facp/AFG/en) Accessed: 27 April 2021

UNHCR (2009) “Fish farming and food-for-work Afghanistan” Story Geneva, Switzerland, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). (https://www.unhcr.org/uk/4ad72cf39.pdf) Accessed: 24 April 2021

Trading Economics (2021) “Afghanistan: Aquaculture Production (metric Tons) 1969-2018 Data” (https://tradingeconomics.com/afghanistan/aquaculture-production-metric-tons-wb-data.html) Accessed: 27 April 2021

Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock, Afghanistan (2019) “Afghanistan produces 10,000 tons fish annually” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OsChOjEVd0I) Accessed: 27 April 2021

Livestock and fish farming bring self-sufficiency to rural Afghans (2018) World Bank (https://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2018/10/28/livestock-and-fish-farming-spur-rural-afghans-toward-self-sufficiency) Accessed: 28 April 2021

Livestock informations (2021) (https://www.facebook.com/20531316728/posts/10154009990506729/) Accessed: 8 May 2021

Food security outlook: Below-average precipitation likely to drive below-average agricultural and livestock production in 2021 (2021) Situation Report USA, Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET). (https://reliefweb.int/report/afghanistan/afghanistan-food-security-outlook-february-september-2021) Accessed: 29 April 2021

Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) (2021) “Afghanistan: Overall average production and income expected from second season crops” Afghanistan - Food security outlook: October 2020 – May 2021 (https://fews.net/central-asia/afghanistan/food-security-outlook/october-2020) Accessed: 29 April 2021

Turkey postpones Afghanistan peace summit over Taliban no-show (2021) Aljazeera (https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/4/21/turkey-postpones-afghanistan-peace-summit-over-taliban-no-show) Accessed: 29 April 2021

Bunting SW (2001) “Appropriation of environmental goods and services by aquaculture: A reassessment employing the ecological footprint methodology and implications for horizontal integration” Aquaculture Research (vol. 32, no. 7, pp. 605–609) https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2109.2001.00563.x

James Sullivan Consulting (2012) “Smart fishing initiative: Comparison of wild-capture fisheries certification schemes” Gland, Switzerland, WWF – World Wide Fund For Nature.

Danish MSS, Zaheb H, Sabory NR, Karimy H, Faiq AB, et al. (2019) “The Road Ahead for Municipal Solid Waste Management in the 21st Century: A Novel-standardized Simulated Paradigm” IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science IOP Publishing, vol. 291 - pp. 1–5. https://doi.org/10.1088/1755-1315/291/1/012009

Sayed Azim Arash (2015) “Establishing hundreds of fish farms in Afghanistan due to increase in demand” BBC News Farsi (https://www.bbc.com/persian/afghanistan/2015/09/150902_k04_fish_farm_in_afghanistan) Accessed: 30 April 2021

Forough K (2020) “Fish farming in Afghanistan” Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock (MAIL), Afghanistan (https://www.mail.gov.af/dr/node/4228) Accessed: 30 April 2021

Barros AF de, Martins MIEG (2012) “Performance and economic indicators of a large scale fish farming in Mato Grosso, Brazil” R Bras Zootec (vol. 41, no. 6, pp. 1325–1331) https://doi.org/10.1590/S1516-35982012000600001

Pettinger T (2019) “Problems of capitalism” Economics Help (https://www.economicshelp.org/blog/77/economics/problems-of-capitalism/) Accessed: 22 April 2021

Fletcher R (2012) “Capitalizing on chaos: Climate change and disaster capitalism” Ephemera theory & politics in organization (vol. 12, no. 1/2, pp. 97–112)

Wei T, Dong W, Yan Q, Chou J, Yang Z, et al. (2016) “Developed and developing world contributions to climate system change based on carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide emissions” Advances in Atmospheric Sciences (vol. 33, no. 5, pp. 632–643) https://doi.org/10.1007/s00376-015-5141-4

United Nations (UN) (1948) “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” United Nations (https://www.un.org/en/about-us/universal-declaration-of-human-rights) Accessed: 29 April 2021

United Nations (UN) (2021) “Article 25 of the universal declaration of human rights” United for Human Rights (https://www.humanrights.com/course/lesson/articles-19-25/read-article-25.html) Accessed: 29 April 2021

FAO (2018) “The future of food and agriculture - Alternative pathways to 2050,” 1st ed. Rome, Italy, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). 60 p. ISBN: 978-92-5-130989-6 (http://www.fao.org/3/CA1553EN/ca1553en.pdf)

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published     
The influence of land management and date of planting on physical properties of Safid e Pai-saye onion (Allium cepa L.
Salari H, Hansra BS, and Saharawat YS.
Journal of Ecoscience and Plant Revolution, 2021, 2 (1): 1-7  DOI 10.37357/1068/jser.2.1.01

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Onion botanically named Allium cepa L. is a major crop of Alliaceae family. It is one of the largest commercially grown vegetables in the world including Afghanistan. This crop originated from Afghanistan and large number of its wild varieties are observed in the country. Local variety named Safid e Paisaye was selected for this investigation due to its capacity of longer storage and higher demand in the market. Very less research efforts are made to improve its bulb quality and share in the market. This investigation is carried out at Kabul university agriculture research farm in coordination with Amity University Uttar Pradesh, to study the effect of land management and planting date on bulb physical properties of onion. The parameters studied in this investigation include bulb width (cm), length (cm), thickness (cm), geometric mean diameter, arithmetic mean diameter, shape index, sphericity, roundness, ellipsoid ratio, frontal surface, cross sectional area, total area, number of scales, equatorial firmness (Kg/cm2) and polar firmness (Kg/cm2). The data is collected using required tools and was analyzed using R statistical analysis software. The results showed significant effect of planting date on physical properties of onion bulb. The first planting date (10th May) recorded the largest bulb width (6.95 cm), length (4.42 cm), thickness (6.75 cm), geometric mean diameter (5.91 cm), arithmetic mean diameter (6.04 cm), frontal surface (24.26 cm2), cross sectional area (28.84 cm2) and total area (110.63 cm2). The same planting date recorded the lowest values for bulb shape index (0.64) and sphericity (0.85). Land management practices did not have significant effect on physical properties of onion bulb. None of the studied factors had significant effect on bulb roundness, ellipsoid ratio, number of scales, equatorial firmness and polar firmness. Conclusions: early planting of Safid e Paisaye onion seedlings can increase bulb size and improve bulb physical characteristics. This also helps to maintain the flat and round shape of onion bulb. Land preparation method and plough depth do not have significant influence on physical properties of onion bulb.

 

PDF
Citation
Authors

Hamid Salari
Department of Horticulture, Amity Institute of Horticulture Studies and Research, Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Noida, India

 

B.S. Hansra
Department of Horticulture, Amity Institute of Horticulture Studies and Research, Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Noida, India

 

Yashpal Singh Saharawat
Department of Soil Science, Indian Agriculture Research Institute, New Delhi, India

 

References
  1. FAOSTAT (http://www.fao.org/faostat/en/#rankings/commodities_by_country) Accessed: 10 March 2021
  2. Onion export from Afghanistan, Tridge (https://www.tridge.com/intelligences/onion/AF/export) Accessed: 17 February 2021
  3. Mehta I (2017) “Origin and History of Onions” IOSR Journal Of Humanities And Social Science (vol. 22, no. 9, pp. 7–10)
  4. Salari H, Hansra BS, Saharwat YS (2020) “Effect of cultural practices on quality and yield of onion (Allium cepa L. Var. Safid e Paisaye)” Journal of Ecoscience and Plant Revolution (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 9–14) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068.jepr.1.1.02
  5. Upadhyay DRK (2016) “Nutraceutical, pharmaceutical and therapeutic uses of Allium cepa: A review” International Journal of Green Pharmacy (IJGP) (vol. 10, no. 1, ) https://doi.org/10.22377/ijgp.v10i1.612 (https://www.greenpharmacy.info/index.php/ijgp/article/view/612) Accessed: 22 April 2020
  6. Lanzotti V (2006) “The analysis of onion and garlic” Journal of Chromatography A (vol. 1112, no. 1, pp. 3–22) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chroma.2005.12.016
  7. Kumar KPS, Bhowmik D, Tiwari P (2010) “Allium cepa: A traditional medicinal herb and its health benefits” J Chem Pharm Res (vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 283–291)
  8. Bharti N, Ram BR (2014) “Estimating variation in the production, quality and economics of onion in response to transplanting dates and sulphur fertilization” European Academic Research (vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 4831–4843)
  9. Misra AD, Kumar A, Meitei I (2014) “Effect of spacing and planting time on growth and yield of onion var. N-53 under Manipur Himalayas” Indian Journal of Horticulture (vol. 71, no. 2, pp. 207–210)
  10. Ali M, Rab A, Ali J, Ahmad H, Hayat S, et al. (2016) “Influence of transplanting dates and population densities on the growth and yield of onion” Pure and Applied Biology (vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 345–354) https://doi.org/10.19045/bspab.2016.50045
  11. Caruso G, Conti S, Villari G, Borrelli C, Melchionna G, et al. (2014) “Effects of transplanting time and plant density on yield, quality and antioxidant content of onion (Allium cepa L.) in southern Italy” Scientia Horticulturae (vol. 166, pp. 111–120) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scienta.2013.12.019
  12. Khokhar KM (2017) “Environmental and genotypic effects on bulb development in onion – a review” The Journal of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology (vol. 92, no. 5, pp. 448–454) https://doi.org/10.1080/14620316.2017.1314199
  13. Aboukhadrah S, Alsayed A, Sobhy L, Abdelmasieh W (2017) “Response of Onion Yield and Quality To Different Planting Date, Methods and Density” Egyptian Journal of Agronomy (vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 203–219) https://doi.org/10.21608/agro.2017.1203.1065
  14. Ali J, Abdurrab, Muhammad H, Ali M, Rashid A, et al. (2016) “Effect of sowing dates and phosphorus levels on growth and bulb production of onion” Pure and Applied Biology (vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 406–417) https://doi.org/10.19045/bspab.2016.50053
  15. Prasad B, Maji S, Meena KR (2017) “Effect of date of transplanting and mulching on growth, yield and quality of onion (Allium cepa L.) cv. Nasik Red” JANS (vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 94–101) https://doi.org/10.31018/jans.v9i1.1156
  16. Gronle A, Lux G, Böhm H, Schmidtke K, Wild M, et al. (2015) “Effect of ploughing depth and mechanical soil loading on soil physical properties, weed infestation, yield performance and grain quality in sole and intercrops of pea and oat in organic farming” Soil and Tillage Research (vol. 148, pp. 59–73) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.still.2014.12.004
  17. Peter Y, Miglena D (2020) “Effect of different types of soil tillage for sunflower on some soil physical characteristics. Part II: bulk density and soil temperature” Helia (vol. 43, no. 73, pp. 133–149) https://doi.org/10.1515/helia-2020-0013
  18. Jabro JD, Stevens WB, Iversen WM, Evans RG (2010) “Tillage Depth Effects on Soil Physical Properties, Sugarbeet Yield, and Sugarbeet Quality” Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis (vol. 41, no. 7, pp. 908–916) https://doi.org/10.1080/00103621003594677
  19. Ewis M, Abd K, Marey R, Abdellatif K (2017) “IMPROVING YIELD, STORABILITY AND WATER PRODUCTIVITY FOR SOME ONION CULTIVARS BY DIFFERENT PLANTING METHODS” Fayoum J Agric Res & Dev, (vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 31–49)
  20. Ahmed K, Nawaz MQ, Hussain SS, Rizwan M, Sarfraz M, et al. (2017) “Response of onion to different nitrogen levels and method of transplanting in moderately salt affected soil” Acta agriculturae Slovenica (vol. 109, no. 2, pp. 303–313) https://doi.org/10.14720/aas.2017.109.2.13
  21. Kabul Monthly Climate Averages, WorldWeatherOnline.com (https://www.worldweatheronline.com/kabul-weather/kabol/af.aspx) Accessed: 10 March 2021
  22. Priya EPB, Sharon MEM, Sinja VR (2015) “ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF CURED SMALL AND BELLARY ONIONS” International Journal of Agricultural Science and Research (IJASR) (vol. 5, no. 5, pp. 323–332)
  23. Keshavarzpour F, Achakzai AKK (2013) “Fruit Shape Classification in Cantaloupe Using the Analysis of Geometrical Attributes” World Engineering & Applied Sciences Journal (vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 1–5) https://doi.org/DOI: 10.5829/idosi.weasj.2013.4.1.1109
  24. Kurniawan YR, Hidayat DD, Luthfiyanti R, Andriansyah RCE, Indriati A (2020) “A comparative study on engineering properties of three varieties of shallots” IOP Conf Ser: Earth Environ Sci (vol. 462, pp. 1–7) https://doi.org/10.1088/1755-1315/462/1/012025
  25. Ikrang EG, Okoko JU (2014) “Physical Properties of Some Tropical Fruits Necessary for Handling” Food Science and Quality Management (vol. 23, pp. 39–45)
  26. Bosekeng G, Coetzer G (2013) “Response of Onion (Allium cepa L.) to sowing dates” African journal of agricultural research (vol. 8, no. 22, pp. 2757–2764) https://doi.org/10.5897/AJAR2013.7035
  27. Gagopale B, Coetzer G (2015) “Response of onion (Allium cepa L.) to sowing date and plant population in the Central Free State, South Africa” African Journal of Agricultural Research (vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 179–187) https://doi.org/10.5897/AJAR2013.8071
Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published     
Impact of Evaporative cooling technology & Post-harvest treatments on shelf life and quality of tomato of two different harvesting stages (Solanum lycopersicum var. Pearson)
Hakimi SS, Raina R, Saharawat YS.
Journal of Ecoscience and Plant Revolution, 2021, 2 (1): 8-16  DOI 10.37357/1068/jser.2.1.02

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

The Zero Energy Cool Chamber (ZECC) is the needed evaporative cooling system introduced as one of the economical small scale on-farm storage in Afghanistan for enhancing the shelf life of tomato and other fresh crops. Tomato is one of the highest value crops, and due to excellent flavor, higher juice, and pulp content of tomato fruits of “Pearson” variety makes it further valuable. Hence, this study aims to understand the effect of ZECC and postharvest treatments on shelf life and quality of tomato’s fruits harvested at turning and light red colors’ stages. Fruits were treated with different concentrations of CaCl2 and mint leaf extract solutions and kept in both ZECC and ambient storages. The shelf life of tomato fruits extended up to 29 days under T4 (turning color fruits + 6% CaCl2 + ZECC). Under the same treatment, the highest firmness as 840.0 grcm-2   and the lowest PLW, Decay Losses and TSS were recorded as 1.80%, 0.0% and 4.400 brix, respectively; on the 20th day of the storage. The lowest shelf life under T11 (Light red color fruits + distilled water dip + Ambient condition) was about 8 days. As a result, the ZECC as an evaporative cooling system significantly enhanced the shelf life and maintained the quality of tomato fruits harvested at the turning color stage treated with 6% CaCl2.

 

 

PDF
Citation
Authors

Sayed Samiullah Hakimi
Horticulture Department, Agriculture Faculty, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan
AIHSR, Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Noida, India

 

Ravinder Raina
AFAF, Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Noida, India

 

Yashpal Singh Saharawat
SSAC, Indian Agriculture Research Institute, New Delhi, India

 

References
  1. Rayaguru K, Khan MK, Sahoo NR (2010) “Water use optimization in zero energy cool chambers for short term storage of fruits and vegetables in coastal area” J Food Sci Technol (vol. 47, no. 4, pp. 437–441) https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-010-0072-7
  2. Lal Basediya A, Samuel DVK, Beera V (2013) “Evaporative cooling system for storage of fruits and vegetables - a review” J Food Sci Technol (vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 429–442) https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-011-0311-6
  3. National Statistics and Information Authority (NSIA) - Afghanistan (2019) “Afghanistan statistical yearbook  2018-19” (https://www.nsia.gov.af:8080/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Afghanistan-Statistical-Yearbook-2018-19_compressed.pdf) Accessed: 1 December 2020
  4. Dandago MA, Gungula D, Nahunnaro H (2017) “Effect of postharvest dip and storage condition on quality and shelf life of tomato fruits (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) in Kura, Nigeria” Pakistan Journal of Food Sciences (vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 61–71)
  5. Dhall RK, Singh P (2013) “Effect of Ethephon and Ethylene Gas on Ripening and Quality of Tomato (Solanum Lycopersicum L.) during Cold Storage” Journal of Nutrition & Food Sciences (vol. 3, no. 6, pp. 1–7) https://doi.org/10.4172/2155-9600.1000244
  6. Dumas Y, Dadomo M, Lucca GD, Grolier P (2003) “Effects of environmental factors and agricultural techniques on antioxidantcontent of tomatoes” Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture (vol. 83, no. 5, pp. 369–382) https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.1370
  7. Pinheiro SCF, Almeida DPF (2008) “Modulation of tomato pericarp firmness through pH and calcium: Implications for the texture of fresh-cut fruit” Postharvest Biology and Technology (vol. 47, no. 1, pp. 119–125) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.postharvbio.2007.06.002
  8. Saraswathy S et al, Preethi TL, Balasubramanyan S, Suresh J, Revathy N, et al. (2013) “Postarvest management of horticultural crops” Jodhpur, Agrobios India. 36–37 p. ISBN: 978-81-7754-322-3
  9. Islam MP, Morimoto T, Hatou K (2012) “Storage behavior of tomato inside a zero energy cool chamber” Agricultural Engineering International: CIGR Journal (vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 209–217)
  10. Islam MP, Morimoto T (2012) “Zero Energy Cool Chamber for Extending the Shelf-Life of Tomato and Eggplant” Japan Agricultural Research Quarterly: JARQ (vol. 46, no. 3, pp. 257–267) https://doi.org/10.6090/jarq.46.257
  11. Abiso E, Satheesh N, Hailu A (2015) “Effect of storage methods and ripening stages on postharvest quality of tomato (Lycopersicom esculentum Mill) cv. Chali” Annals. Food Science and Technology 2015 Targoviste, Romania, Valahia University Press, vol. 16 - pp. 127–137. (https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/9809/8738e65c315b8a4efc4c4adede4d821448ac.pdf?_ga=2.219181342.643294641.1587536878-321628801.1585267670) Accessed: 1 November 2019
  12. Arthur E, Oduro I, Kumah P (2015) “Postharvest Quality Response of Tomato (Lycopersicon Esculentum, Mill) Fruits to Different Concentrations of Calcium Chloride at Different Dip- Times” American Journal of Food and Nutrition (pp. 1–8)
  13. Al-Sum BA (2013) “Antimicrobial activity of the aqueous extract of mint plant” SJCM (vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 110) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.sjcm.20130203.19
  14. Moghaddam M, Pourbaige M, Tabar HK, Farhadi N, Hosseini SMA (2013) “Composition and Antifungal Activity of Peppermint (Mentha piperita) Essential Oil from Iran” Journal of Essential Oil Bearing Plants (vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 506–512) https://doi.org/10.1080/0972060X.2013.813265
  15. A LB, Dv S, V B (2011) “Evaporative cooling system for storage of fruits and vegetables - a review.” J Food Sci Technol (vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 429–442) https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-011-0311-6
  16. Senevirathna P, Daundasekera W a. M (2010) “Effect of Senevirathna P, Daundasekera W a. M (2010) “Effect of postharvest calcium chloride vacuum infiltration on the shelf life and quality of tomato (cv. ’Thilina’)” Ceylon Journal of Science (Biological Sciences) (vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 35–44) https://doi.org/10.4038/cjsbs.v39i1.2351
  17. Moneruzzaman KM, Hossain ABMS, Sani W, Saifuddin M, Alenazi M (2009) “Effect of harvesting and storage conditions on the post harvest quality of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) cv. Roma VF” Australian Journal of Crop Science (vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 113–121)
  18. Casierra-Posada F, Aguilar-Avendaño ÓE (2008) “Quality of tomato fruits (Solanum lycopersicum L.) harvested at different maturity stages” Agronomía Colombiana (vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 300–307)
  19. Parker R, Maalekuu B (2013) “The effect of harvesting stage on fruit quality and shelf-life of four tomato cultivars (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill).” undefined https://doi.org/10.5251/ABJNA.2013.4.3.252.259 (/paper/The-effect-of-harvesting-stage-on-fruit-quality-and-Parker-Maalekuu/a0df4840e653e4e8394bfd352330722f71aa105c) Accessed: 17 May 2021
  20. Chepngeno J, Owino W, Kinyuru J, Nenguwo N (2016) “Effect of Calcium Chloride and Hydrocooling on Postharvest Quality of Selected Vegetables” Journal of Food Research (vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 23–40) https://doi.org/10.5539/jfr.v5n2p23
  21. Wu T, Abbott JA (2002) “Firmness and force relaxation characteristics of tomatoes stored intact or as slices” Postharvest Biology and Technology (vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 59–68) https://doi.org/10.1016/S0925-5214(01)00133-8
  22. Sabreen ML, l-Ali Ghalib NH, l-Shimmery (2011) “Effect of ripening class and dipping in calcium chloride and the storage time on storage characters of tomato fruits. Lycopersicon esculentum Mill)” urnal Of Tikrit University For Agricultural Sciences (vol. 11, no. 4, )
Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published  
A study on sustainability of internal power generation compared with imported power in Afghanistan 
Wali M, Majidi H, Abdullah MA, and Yaqobi MH.
Journal of Sustainability Outreach, 2020, 1 (1): 1-9  DOI 10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.021

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Currently, Afghanistan imports a high percentage of electric energy from the neighboring countries, while less attention has been paid on the utilization of internal domestic energy resources. Recently progress has been made with solar and wind energy, but other sources such as hydro energy remain underappreciated. Originally intended as a short-term solution to fulfill demand, the policy for importing power from neighboring countries is still in effect as energy demand has increased dramatically and exposed vulnerabilities in the existing power system. These issues can be categorized based on different aspects like technical, economic, political, security-related issues, natural disasters and many others that negatively affect the reliability of the energy sector. In this paper, the sustainability of the power system of Afghanistan is analyzed from different aspects. These multi-disciplinary problems are analyzed separately and linked with the weaknesses of the existing power system. The main objective of this study is to propose long-term solutions to the power sector by encouraging investment in the internal power generation to enhance sustainability and reliability. The proposed long-term solution also takes additional measures towards achieving sustainable development goals (SDG) such as economic growth, agricultural development, groundwater recharge, industrial development, flood and water control, job creation, and a green and clean environment.

Citation

REPA

Wali M, Majidi H, Abdullah MA, Yaqobi MH (2020) “A study on sustainability of internal power generation compared with imported power in Afghanistan” Journal of Sustainability Outreach (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–9) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.01

 

APA

Wali, M., Majidi, H., Abdullah, M. A., & Yaqobi, M. H. (2020). A study on sustainability of internal power generation compared with imported power in Afghanistan. Journal of Sustainability Outreach, 1(1), 1–9. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.01

 

MLA

Wali, Mohebullah, et al. “A Study on Sustainability of Internal Power Generation Compared with Imported Power in Afghanistan.” Journal of Sustainability Outreach, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020, pp. 1–9, doi:10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.01.

 

Vancouver

Wali M, Majidi H, Abdullah MA, Yaqobi MH. A study on sustainability of internal power generation compared with imported power in Afghanistan. J Sustainability Outreach. 2020;1(1):1–9.

 

Chicago

Wali, Mohebullah, Himayatullah Majidi, Milad Ahmad Abdullah, and Mohammad Homayoun Yaqobi. 2020. “A Study on Sustainability of Internal Power Generation Compared with Imported Power in Afghanistan.” Journal of Sustainability Outreach 1 (1): 1–9. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.01.

 

Elsevier

Wali, M., Majidi, H., Abdullah, M.A., Yaqobi, M.H., 2020. A study on sustainability of internal power generation compared with imported power in Afghanistan. J. Sustainability Outreach 1, 1–9. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.01 

 

IEEE

Wali, H. Majidi, M. A. Abdullah, and M. H. Yaqobi, “A study on sustainability of internal power generation compared with imported power in Afghanistan,” J. Sustainability Outreach, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–9, 2020, doi: 10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.01.

 

Springer

Wali, M., Majidi, H., Abdullah, M.A., Yaqobi, M.H.: A study on sustainability of internal power generation compared with imported power in Afghanistan. J. Sustainability Outreach. 1, 1–9 (2020). https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.01.

Authors

Mohebullah Wali
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Himayatullah Majidi
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Milad Ahmad Abdullah
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Mohammad Homayoun Yaqobi
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

References
  1. Afghanistan renewable energy development issues and options (2018) Washington, D.C. 107 p.

  2. World Bank (2013) “Toward a sustainable energy future for all: Directions for the World Bank Group’s energy sector” Washington, D.C. 31 p.

  3. Alamyar KM (2014) “Renewable energy for sustainable development” Kabul. 1–14 p.

  4. Afghanistan rural renewable energy policy (2013) Kabul. 20 p.

  5. Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Ludin GA, et al. (2017) “Afghanistan’s aspirations for energy independence: Water resources and hydropower energy” Renewable Energy (vol. 113, pp. 1276–1287) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2017.06.090

  6. Neifer R (2014) “Technical assistance consultant’s report - Afghanistan: Addendum to the Afghanistan power sector master plan” Stuttgart. 127 p.

  7. Afghan Energy Information Center (AEIC) (2012) “Electricity monthly production report” Kabul, Afghanistan, Afghan Energy Information Center (AEIC). (http://aeic.af/)

  8. Power sector master plan. Technical assistance consultants report: Project number 43497 (2013) Kabul.

  9. Ahmadzai S, McKinna A (2018) “Afghanistan electrical energy and trans-boundary water systems analyses: Challenges and opportunities” Energy Reports (vol. 4, pp. 435–469) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egyr.2018.06.003

  10. Fichtner GmbH (2013) “Islamic Republic of Afghanistan: Power sector master plan” (pp. 451)

  11. Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Senjyu T, Ludin GA, et al. (2017) “Electricity Sector Development Trends in an After-war Country: Afghanistan Aspiration for an Independent Energy Country” Journal of Energy and Power Engineering (vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 553–557) https://doi.org/10.17265/1934-8975/2017.08.007

  12. Sadiqi M. (2012) “Basic design and cost optimization of a hybrid power system in rural communities in Afghanistan. MSc Thises.” The Kansas State University

  13. Safi, R. & Sharma MP (2019) “Energy scenario of Afghanistan” IOSR Journal of Engineering (IOSRJEN) (vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 50–59)

  14. Energy supply improvement investment program, sector assessment summary: Energy (2015) Kabul.

  15. Da Afghanistan Breshna Sherkat (DABS) (2016) “CASA and TUTAP Power interconnection project” Islamabad. 16 p.

  16. Bochkarev D (2014) “Afghanistan reconnected: Linking energy supplies toconsumers in Asia” New York. 28 p.

  17. Ministry of Energy and Water (MEW) and Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development (MRRD) (2013) “Afghanistan Rural Renewable Energy Policy” Kabul, Ministry of Energy and Water (MEW) and Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development (MRRD).

  18. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (2011) “Afghanistan-NREL Resource Maps and Toolkits” National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). (https://www.osti.gov/biblio/982282-solar-wind-resource-assessments-afghanistan-pakistan) Accessed: 18 October 2019

  19. Burns RK (2011) “Afghanistan: Solar assets, electricity production, and rural energy factors” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 2144–2148) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2010.12.002

  20. Regional projects and masterplanning - Overview (2019) Inter-ministerial Commission of Energy (ICE)

  21. Ershad AM (2017) “Institutional and policy assessment of renewable energy sector in Afghanistan” Journal of Renewable Energy (vol. 2017, pp. 1–10) https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5723152

  22. Samadi AR (2011) “Energy consumption and available energy resources in Afghanistan” Kabul. 23 p.

  23. Renewable energy department database (2015) Ministry of Energy and Water (MEW) (https://nwara.gov.af/en) Accessed: 16 November 2019

  24. Ahmadzai S, McKinna A (2018) “Afghanistan electrical energy and trans-boundary water systems analyses: Challenges and opportunities” Energy Reports (vol. 4, pp. 435–469) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egyr.2018.06.003

  25. Meisen, P., Azizy P (2008) “Rural Electrification in Afghanistan: How do we electrify the villages of Afghanistan?” San Diego. 26 p.

  26. Afghanistan renewable energy policy (2013) Kabul.

  27. Afghanistan energy sector update (2016) Kabul.

  28. Milbrandt A, Overend R (2011) “Assessment of biomass resources in Afghanistan” Colorado. 45 p.

  29. Afghanistan living conditions survey 2013-2014: National risk and vulnerability assessment (2019) Kabul.

  30. Fahimi A, Upham P (2018) “The renewable energy sector in Afghanistan: Policy and potential” Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Energy and Environment (vol. 7, no. 2, pp. e280) https://doi.org/10.1002/wene.280

  31. Ludin GA, Matayoshi H, Danish MSS, Yona A, Senjyu T (2017) “Hybrid PV/Wind/Diesel Based Distributed Generation for an Off-Grid Rural Village in Afghanistan” Journal of Energy and Power Engineering (vol. 11, no. 2, ) https://doi.org/10.17265/1934-8975/2017.02.003

  32. Saba DS et al. (2004) “Geothermal energy in Afghanistan: prospects and potential” New York. 38 p.

  33. Habib H (2014) “Water related problems in Afghanistan” International Journal of International Studies (vol. 01, no. 03, pp. 137–144) https://doi.org/10.29171/azu_acku_pamphlet_td313_a3_h335_2014

  34. Palau RG (2013) “Water security: Afghanistan transboundary water resources in regional context” Transboundary Issues (vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 1–15)

  35. Asian Development Bank (ADB) (2019) “Technical assistance consultant’s report - Feasibility study report component 3: Water supply” Kabul. 62 p.

  36. Mundi index (2019) Index Mundi (https://www.indexmundi.com/) Accessed: 16 November 2019

  37. Watson P (2011) “Kandahar struggles for reliable electricity” (https://www.thestar.com/news/world/2011/01/25/kandahar_struggles_for_reliable_electricity.html) Accessed: 16 November 2019

  38. Glasse J (2013) “Eastern Afghanistan struggles for power”

  39. Atef SS, Sadeqinazhad F, Farjaad F, Amatya DM (2019) “Water conflict management and cooperation between Afghanistan and Pakistan” Journal of Hydrology (vol. 570, pp. 875–892) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2018.12.075

  40. Hanasz P (2012) “The politics of water security between Afghanistan and Iran” Published by Future Directions International Pty Ltd.

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published  
Afghanistan as an emerging regional energy hub  
Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Zaheb H, Sabory NR, Ahamadi M, Ibrahimi AM, Nazari Z, and Ahadi MH.
Journal of Sustainability Outreach, 2020, 1 (1): 10-14  DOI 10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.02

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

The enormous potential supply of energy in central Asia offers an excellent opportunity to estab-lish international energy-sharing agreements, mitigate political instability, and improve regional socio-economic development. Pakistan and India have increasingly relied on energy imported from Middle and Central Asia to meet frequent energy shortages. Afghanistan has played a central role in recent efforts to balance energy trade among regional countries with an emerging opportunity as an emerging energy hub. This study considers what energy trade policies and strategies are needed to transform Afghanistan from energy consumer to energy provider. This analysis sum-marizes multi-disciplinary approaches that target geopolitics, economic, trade, management, insti-tutional, environmental, and technical aspects. This study avoided a commentary description of the subject. The overriding objective of this study is addressing key solutions to enable Afghani-stan as a leading stakeholder of the energy hub in the region countries. The finding of this study is outlined in 30 recommendations. Beneficiaries and stakeholders also express increasing concern about Afghanistan’s current security and political stability. This brief study can inform students, researchers, scholars, and interested policymakers with the recent trends and future outlook.

Citation

REPA

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Zaheb H, Sabory NR, Ahmadi M, et al. (2020) “Afghanistan as an emerging regional energy hub” Journal of Sustainability Outreach (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 10–14) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.02

 

APA

Danish, M. S. S., Senjyu, T., Zaheb, H., Sabory, N. R., Ahmadi, M., Ibrahimi, A. M., Nazari, Z., & Ahadi, M. H. (2020). Afghanistan as an emerging regional energy hub. Journal of Sustainability Outreach, 1(1), 10–14. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.02

 

MLA

Danish, Mir Sayed Shah, et al. “Afghanistan as an Emerging Regional Energy Hub.” Journal of Sustainability Outreach, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020, pp. 10–14. Open WorldCat, doi:10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.02.

 

Vancouver

Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Zaheb H, Sabory NR, Ahmadi M, Ibrahimi AM, et al. Afghanistan as an emerging regional energy hub. J Sustainability Outreach. 2020;1(1):10–4.

 

Chicago

Danish, Mir Sayed Shah, Tomonobu Senjyu, Hameedullah Zaheb, Najib Rahman Sabory, Mikaeel Ahmadi, Abdul Matin Ibrahimi, Zahra Nazari, and Mohammad Hamid Ahadi. 2020. “Afghanistan as an Emerging Regional Energy Hub.” Journal of Sustainability Outreach 1 (1): 10–14. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.02.

 

Elsevier

Danish, M.S.S., Senjyu, T., Zaheb, H., Sabory, N.R., Ahmadi, M., Ibrahimi, A.M., Nazari, Z., Ahadi, M.H., 2020. Afghanistan as an emerging regional energy hub. J. Sustainability Outreach 1, 10–14. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.02

 

IEEE

  1. S. S. Danish et al., “Afghanistan as an emerging regional energy hub,” J. Sustainability Outreach, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 10–14, 2020, doi: 10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.02.

 

Springer

Danish, M.S.S., Senjyu, T., Zaheb, H., Sabory, N.R., Ahmadi, M., Ibrahimi, A.M., Nazari, Z., Ahadi, M.H.: Afghanistan as an emerging regional energy hub. J. Sustainability Outreach. 1, 10–14 (2020). https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.02.

Authors

Mir Sayed Shah Danish
Strategic Research Projects Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan

Tomonobu Senjyu

Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan

Hameedullah Zaheb

Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Najib Rahman Sabory

Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Mikaeel Ahamadi

Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan

Abdul Matin Ibrahimi

Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan

Zahra Nazari

Department of Information Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul Polytechnic University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Mohammad Hamid Ahadi

Department of Academic Affairs, Research and Education Promotion Association (REPA), Okinawa, Japan

References
  1. Sadat SM (2015) “TAPI and CASA-1000: Win-Win Trade between Central Asia and South Asia” Norwegian Institute of International Affairs: OSCE Academy (vol. 25, pp. 1–18)

  2. Sasaki D, Nakayama M (2015) “A study on the risk management of the CASA-1000 project” Hydrological Research Letters (vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 90–96) https://doi.org/10.3178/hrl.9.90

  3. NS Energy (2019) “CASA-1000 Central Asia-South Asia Electricity Transmission Project” EN Energy (https://www.nsenergybusiness.com/projects/casa-1000-electricity-transmission/) Accessed: 3 October 2019

  4. Central Asia-South Asia Electricity Transmission and Trade Project (CASA-1000) (n.d.) World Bank (https://www.worldbank.org/en/news/speech/2016/05/10/central-asia-south-asia-electricity-transmission-and-trade-project-casa-1000) Accessed: 8 April 2020

  5. Huda MS, Ali SH (2017) “Energy diplomacy in South Asia: Beyond the security paradigm in accessing the TAPI pipeline project” Energy Research & Social Science (vol. 34, pp. 202–213) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.erss.2017.07.013

  6. Turkmenistan-Afghanistan-Pakistan-India (TAPI) Gas Pipeline Project (2018) Hydrocarbons Technology (https://www.hydrocarbons-technology.com/projects/turkmenistan-afghanistan-pakistan-india-tapi-gas-pipeline-project/) Accessed: 3 October 2019

  7. Yılmaz ML, Talash F (2017) “Afghanistan’s Integration to the New Silk Route” Journal of Security Studies (vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 57–73)

  8. CASA-1000: perspectives (2018) The Chamber of Commerce and Industry Romania-Turkmenistan (https://ccirom-tkm.ro/2018/01/10/casa-1000-perspectives/) Accessed: 3 October 2019

  9. Briefing SR (2018) “China to Join Turkmenistan-Afghanistan-Pakistan-India Pipeline?” Silk Road Briefing (https://www.silkroadbriefing.com/news/2018/09/06/china-join-turkmenistan-afghanistan-pakistan-india-pipeline/) Accessed: 3 October 2019

  10. Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Ludin GA, Yona A, et al. (2016) “An Open-door Immature Policy for Rural Electrification: A Case Study of Afghanistan” International Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy (vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 8–13) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijrse.s.2017060301.12

  11. Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Senjyu T, Ludin GA, et al. (2017) “Electricity Sector Development Trends in an After-war Country: Afghanistan Aspiration for an Independent Energy Country” Journal of Energy and Power Engineering (vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 553–557) https://doi.org/10.17265/1934-8975/2017.08.007

  12. Danish MSS (2018) “A Managed Energy Framework for Least Developed Countries: Resilience to Energy Sustainability” (Doctoral Dissertation) Okinawa, Japan, University of the Ryukyus (http://ir.lib.u-ryukyu.ac.jp/handle/20.500.12000/41505?mode=full&metadispmode=lang)

  13. Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Zaheb H, Sabory NR, Ibrahimi AM, et al. (2019) “A novel transdisciplinary paradigm for municipal solid waste to energy” Journal of Cleaner Production (vol. 233, pp. 880–892)

  14. Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Ershad AM, Danish SMS, Yona A, et al. (2017) “Sustainable Architecture and Urban Planning trough Exploitation of Renewable Energy” International Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy (vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 1–7) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijrse.s.2017060301.11

  15. Danish MSS, Yona A, Senjyu T (2014) “Pre-design and life cycle cost analysis of a hybrid power system for rural and remote communities in Afghanistan” The Journal of Engineering-IET (vol. 2014, no. 8, pp. 438–444) https://doi.org/10.1049/joe.2014.0172

  16. Inc I (2015) “Pakistan Energy Policy, Laws and Regulations Handbook Volume 1 Strategic Information and Basic Laws,” 1st ed. Lulu. 285 p. ISBN: 978-1-329-04854-6

  17. Danish MSS, Elsayed MEL, Ahmadi M, Senjyu T, Karimy H, et al. (2020) “A strategic-integrated approach for sustainable energy deployment” Energy Reports (vol. 6, pp. 40–44) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egyr.2019.11.039

  18. Danish MSS, Matayoshi H, Howlader HR, Chakraborty S, Mandal P, et al. (2019) “Microgrid Planning and Design: Resilience to Sustainability” 2019 IEEE PES GTD Grand International Conference and Exposition Asia (GTD Asia) Bangkok, Thailand, IEEE - pp. 253–258. https://doi.org/10.1109/GTDAsia.2019.8716010

  19. Danish MSS, Zaheb H, Sabory NR, Karimy H, Faiq AB, et al. (2019) “The Road Ahead for Municipal Solid Waste Management in the 21st Century: A Novel-standardized Simulated Paradigm” IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science (vol. 291, pp. 1–5) https://doi.org/10.1088/1755-1315/291/1/012009

  20. Jewell J (2011) “The IEA Model of Short-term Energy Security (MOSES): Primary Energy Sources and Secondary Fuels International Energy Agency” Working Paper Paris, France, International Energy Agency (IEA). (https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/docserver/5k9h0wd2ghlv-en.pdf?expires=1586349622&id=id&accname=guest&checksum=7EC52F293F0493C53EEFF3390BC6E248) Accessed: 4 August 2020

  21. Rostami R, Khoshnava SM, Lamit H, Streimikiene D, Mardani A (2017) “An overview of Afghanistan’s trends toward renewable and sustainable energies” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews (vol. 76, pp. 1440–1464) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2016.11.172

  22. Danish MSS, Funabashi T (2014) “Explicit recognition of Afghanistan’s power distribution networks problems and technical suggestions” TENCON 2014 - 2014 IEEE Region 10 Conference pp. 1–6. https://doi.org/10.1109/TENCON.2014.7022402

  23. Danish MSS, Senjyu TS (2020) “Green Building Efficiency and Sustainability Indicators” Green Building Management and Smart Automation , 1st ed. pp. 128–145.

  24. Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Ibrahimi AM, Ahmadi M, Howlader AM (2019) “A managed framework for energy-efficient building” Journal of Building Engineering (vol. 21, pp. 120–128) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jobe.2018.10.013

  25. Ebel RE, Menon R (2000) “Energy and Conflict in Central Asia and the Caucasus” Rowman & Littlefield. 290 p. ISBN: 978-0-7425-0063-1

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published  
Role of micro-hydropower plants in socio-economic development of rural Afghanistan 
Sadiq MAF, Sabory NR, Danish MSS, and  Senjyu T.
Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution, 2020, 1 (1): 1-7  DOI 10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.01

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Afghanistan hosts the Hindu Kush, an extension of the Himalaya mountains that act as water sources for five major rivers flowing through Afghanistan. Most of these rivers provide promise for the construction of water dams and installment of micro hydropower plants (MHP). Although civil war and political strife continue to threaten the country for more than four decades, the Afghan government introduced strategic plans for the development of the country. In 2016 Afghanistan introduced the Afghanistan National Peace and Development (ANPD) Framework at Brussels de-signed to support Afghanistan’s progress towards achieving the SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals). This study discussed the 7th Goal (ensuring access to affordable, reliable, and sustainable energy for all) and 8th Goal (promoting sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all) alignment in Afghanistan. The Afghan government acknowledges its responsibility to provide electricity for all of its citizens, but this can only be achieved if the government can secure a reliable source of energy. Afghanistan’s mountainous terrain provides a challenge to build a central energy distribution system. Therefore this study looks for alternative solutions to the energy problems in Afghanistan and explores feasibility of micro-hydropower plant installations in remote areas. This study evaluated socio-economic im-pacts of micro-hydropower plants in the life of average residents. We focused on one example of a micro hydropower plant located in Parwan, conducted interviews with local residents, and gathered on-site data. The findings in this study can help policymakers to analyze the effects of development projects in the social and economic life of residents. It will encourage the government and hopefully the private sector to invest in decentralized energy options, while the country is facing an ever-growing energy demand.

Citation

REPA

Sadiq MAF, Sabory NR, Danish MSS, Senjyu T (2020) “Role of micro hydropower plants in socio-economic development of rural in Afghanistan” Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–7) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.01

 

APA

Sadiq, M. A. F., Sabory, N. R., Danish, M. S. S., & Senjyu, T. (2020). Role of micro hydropower plants in socio-economic development of rural in Afghanistan. Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution, 1(1), 1–7. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.01

 

MLA

Sadiq, Mohammad Airaj Firdaws, et al. “Role of Micro Hydropower Plants in Socio-Economic Development of Rural in Afghanistan.” Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020, pp. 1–7, doi:10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.01.

 

Vancouver

Sadiq MAF, Sabory NR, Danish MSS, Senjyu T. Role of micro hydropower plants in socio-economic development of rural in Afghanistan. J Sustain Energy Rev. 2020;1(1):1–7.

 

Chicago

Sadiq, Mohammad Airaj Firdaws, Najib Rahman Sabory, Mir Sayed Shah Danish, and Tomonobu Senjyu. 2020. “Role of Micro Hydropower Plants in Socio-Economic Development of Rural in Afghanistan.” Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution 1 (1): 1–7. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.01.

 

Elsevier

Sadiq, M.A.F., Sabory, N.R., Danish, M.S.S., Senjyu, T., 2020. Role of micro hydropower plants in socio-economic development of rural in Afghanistan. J. Sustain Energy Rev. 1, 1–7. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.01

 

IEEE

  1. A. F. Sadiq, N. R. Sabory, M. S. S. Danish, and T. Senjyu, “Role of micro hydropower plants in socio-economic development of rural in Afghanistan,” J. Sustain Energy Rev., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–7, 2020, doi: 10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.01.

 

Springer

Sadiq, M.A.F., Sabory, N.R., Danish, M.S.S., Senjyu, T.: Role of micro hydropower plants in socio-economic development of rural in Afghanistan. J. Sustain Energy Rev. 1, 1–7 (2020). https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jso.1.1.01

Authors

Mohammad Airaj Firdaws Sadiq
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Najib Rahman Sabory

Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Mir Sayed Shah Danish

Strategic Research Projects Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan

Tomonobu Senjyu

Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan

References
  1. Peters J, Harsdorff M, Ziegler F (2009) “Rural electrifica-tion: Accelerating impacts with complementary services” Energy for Sustainable Development (vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 38–42) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.esd.2009.01.004

  2. Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Ludin GA, et al. (2017) “Afghanistan’s aspirations for energy inde-pendence: Water resources and hydropower energy” Re-newable Energy (vol. 113, pp. 1276–1287) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2017.06.090

  3. Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Senjyu T, Ludin GA, et al. (2017) “Electricity Sector Development Trends in an After-war Country: Afghanistan Aspiration for an In-dependent Energy Country” Journal of Energy and Power Engineering (vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 553–557) https://doi.org/10.17265/1934-8975/2017.08.007

  4. Ludin GA, Matayoshi H, Danish MSS, Yona A, Senjyu T (2017) “Hybrid PV/Wind/Diesel Based Distributed Gen-eration for an Off-Grid Rural Village in Afghanistan” Jour-nal of Energy and Power Engineering (vol. 11, no. 2, ) https://doi.org/10.17265/1934-8975/2017.02.003

  5. Danish MSS, Yona A, Senjyu T (2014) “Pre-design and life cycle cost analysis of a hybrid power system for rural and remote communities in Afghanistan” The Journal of Engineering-IET (vol. 2014, no. 8, pp. 438–444) https://doi.org/10.1049/joe.2014.0172

  6. Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Ludin GA, Yona A, et al. (2016) “An Open-door Immature Policy for Rural Electrification: A Case Study of Afghanistan” International Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy (vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 8–13) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijrse.s.2017060301.12

  7. unicef - for every child (n.d.) “Climate Change” Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (https://www.unicef.org/wash/3942_4472.html) Ac-cessed: 8 April 2020

  8. The Ripple Effect: Climate change and children’s access to water and sanitation (n.d.) New York, USA, United Na-tions Children’s Fund (UNICEF). (https://www.unicef.org/wash/files/Climate_change_WASH_Brief.pdf) Accessed: 4 August 2020

  9. A Look At Education In Post-Taliban Afghanistan (n.d.) TOLOnews (/opinion/look-education-post-taliban-afghanistan) Accessed: 8 April 2020

  10. All in School and Learning: Global Initiative on Out-Of-School Children – Afghanistan Country Study (2018) Af-ghanistan country study Kabul, Afghanistan, Ministry of Education, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (unicef). (https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/afg-report-oocs2018.pdf) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  11. Assisting vulnerable for change (n.d.) Helping Orphans (https://helpingorphans.co.uk/) Accessed: 8 April 2020

  12. Schiffbauer J, O’Brien JB, Timmons BK, Kiarie WN (2008) “The role of leadership in HRH development in challeng-ing public health settings” Hum Resour Health (vol. 6, pp. 23) https://doi.org/10.1186/1478-4491-6-23

  13. Strategic Plan for the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) 2011-2015 (2011) (https://www.gfmer.ch/country-coordinators/pdf/Ministry-Public-Health-Strategic-Plan-2011-2015-Afghanistan.pdf) Accessed: 4 August 2019

  14. Wood Smoke and Your Health (2013) EPA - United States Environmental Protection Agency (https://www.epa.gov/burnwise/wood-smoke-and-your-health) Accessed: 8 April 2020

  15. Upgrading Rural Afghanistan’s Water Supply (2018) USAID Global Waters (https://medium.com/usaid-global-waters/upgrading-a-war-torn-country-rural-water-supply-13ece938aca2) Accessed: 8 April 2020

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published  
Renewable energy potential for sustainable development in Afghanistan 
Slimankhil AK, Anwarzai MA, Sabory NR, Danish MSS, Ahmadi M, and Ahadi MH.
Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution, 2020, 1 (1): 8-15  DOI 10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.02

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Afghanistan is one of the developing countries in South Asia with an enormous renewable and nonrenewable energy resources. Since 1893, utilization of secondary (modern) form of energy in Afghanistan has been pursued. The trends of sustainable energy provision have been reinforced after the post-conflicts in Afghanistan. The Sustainable Development Goal-7 (affordable and clean energy access) encourages nations to assess their resource development of renewable, affordable, and accessible energy. Unlike many developing countries that struggle to identify domestic sources of clean, sustainable energy, Afghanistan has hydro, solar, wind, and geothermal resources as assets. This literature review analyzes Afghanistan’s potential for renewable energy to identify obstacles and challenges like security, economics, and technology. Using surveys conducted by national and international organizations. This research evaluates Afghanistan’s progress in meeting SDG-7, identifies the main barriers for renewable energy development, and offers recommended solutions. This study reveals the facts of energy sector development in Afghanistan to enable students, researchers, and practitioners with an overview of the current situation and future direction of the energy sector. Also, this study offers a concise outlook for energy sector investors and donors at the national and international stages.

Citation

REPA

Slimankhil AK, Anwarzai MA, Sabory NR, Danish MSS, Ahmadi M, et al. (2020) “Renewable energy potential for sustainable development in Afghanistan” Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 8–15) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.02

 

APA

Slimankhil, A. K., Anwarzai, M. A., Sabory, N. R., Danish, M. S. S., Ahmadi, M., & Ahadi, M. H. (2020). Renewable energy potential for sustainable development in Afghanistan. Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution, 1(1), 8–15. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.02

 

MLA

Slimankhil, Ahmad Khalid, et al. “Renewable Energy Potential for Sustainable Development in Afghanistan.” Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020, pp. 8–15. Zotero, doi:10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.02.

 

Vancouver

Slimankhil AK, Anwarzai MA, Sabory NR, Danish MSS, Ahmadi M, Ahadi MH. Renewable energy potential for sustainable development in Afghanistan. J Sustain Energy Rev. 2020;1(1):8–15.

 

Chicago

Slimankhil, Ahmad Khalid, Mohammad Abed Anwarzai, Najib Rahman Sabory, Mir Sayed Shah Danish, Mikaeel Ahmadi, and Mohammad Hamid Ahadi. 2020. “Renewable Energy Potential for Sustainable Development in Afghanistan.” Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution 1 (1): 8–15. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.02.

 

Elsevier

Slimankhil, A.K., Anwarzai, M.A., Sabory, N.R., Danish, M.S.S., Ahmadi, M., Ahadi, M.H., 2020. Renewable energy potential for sustainable development in Afghanistan. J. Sustain Energy Rev. 1, 8–15. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.02

 

IEEE

  1. K. Slimankhil, M. A. Anwarzai, N. R. Sabory, M. S. S. Danish, M. Ahmadi, and M. H. Ahadi, “Renewable energy potential for sustainable development in Afghanistan,” J. Sustain Energy Rev., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 8–15, 2020, doi: 10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.02.

 

Springer

Slimankhil, A.K., Anwarzai, M.A., Sabory, N.R., Danish, M.S.S., Ahmadi, M., Ahadi, M.H.: Renewable energy potential for sustainable development in Afghanistan. J. Sustain Energy Rev. 1, 8–15 (2020). https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.02.

Authors

Ahmad Khalid Slimankhil
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Mohammad Abed Anwarzai

Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Najib Rahman Sabory

Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Mir Sayed Shah Danish

Strategic Research Projects Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan

Mikaeel Ahmadi

Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan

Mohammad Hamid Ahadi

Department of Academic Affairs, Research and Education Promotion Association (REPA), Okinawa, Japan

References
  1. Energy and climate change (2015) WEO-2015 Special Report Paris, France, International Energy Agency (IEA). (https://webstore.iea.org/weo-2015-special-report-energy-and-climate-change) Accessed: 7 April 2020

  2. Global energy demand grew by 2.1% in 2017, and car-bon emissions rose for the first time since 2014 (2018) International Energy Agency (AEI) (https://www.iea.org/news/global-energy-demand-grew-by-21-in-2017-and-carbon-emissions-rose-for-the-first-time-since-2014) Accessed: 7 April 2020

  3. Ekouevi K, Tuntivate V (2012) “Household energy access for cooking and heating: lessons learned and the way forward,” 1st ed. Washington DC, USA, The World Bank. p. ISBN: 978-1-78076-013-1

  4. Masih Sediqi M, Or Rashid Howlader H, Matin Ibrahimi A, Sayed Shah Danish M, Rahman Sabory N, et al. (2017) “Development of renewable energy resources in Afghani-stan for economically optimized cross-border electricity trading” AIMS Energy (vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 691–717) https://doi.org/10.3934/energy.2017.4.691

  5. Afghanistan population (2020) - Worldometer (2020) Worldometer (https://www.worldometers.info/world-population/afghanistan-population/) Accessed: 7 April 2020

  6. Rezaei M, Naghdi-Khozani N, Jafari N (2020) “Wind en-ergy utilization for hydrogen production in an underde-veloped country: An economic investigation” Renewable Energy (vol. 147, pp. 1044–1057) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2019.09.079

  7. Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Ludin GA, et al. (2017) “Afghanistan’s aspirations for energy inde-pendence: Water resources and hydropower energy” Re-newable Energy (vol. 113, pp. 1276–1287) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2017.06.090

  8. Jahangiri M, Haghani A, Mostafaeipour A, Khosravi A, Raeisi HA (2019) “Assessment of solar-wind power plants in Afghanistan: A review” Renewable and Sustaina-ble Energy Reviews (vol. 99, pp. 169–190) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2018.10.003

  9. Ershad AM (2017) “Institutional and policy assessment of renewable energy sector in Afghanistan” Journal of Re-newable Energy (vol. 2017, pp. e5723152) https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5723152

  10. Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Senjyu T, Ludin GA, et al. (2017) “Electricity sector transitions in an after war country: A review of Afghanistan’s Electricity” Journal of Energy and Power Engineering (vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 491–496) https://doi.org/10.17265/1934-8975/2017.07.008

  11. Electricity imports statistics (2017) Kabul, Afghanistan, Da Afghanistan Breshna Sherkat (DABS).

  12. Domestic hydro generation (2020) Afghanistan Inter-Ministerial Commission for Energy (ICE) (https://sites.google.com/site/iceafghanistan/electricity-supply/domestic-generation-1/domestic-hydro-generation) Accessed: 7 April 2020

  13. Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Senjyu T, Ludin GA, et al. (2017) “Electricity sector development trends in an after-war country: Afghanistan aspiration for an inde-pendent energy country” Journal of Energy and Power Engineering (vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 553–557) https://doi.org/10.17265/1934-8975/2017.08.007

  14. Bank AD (2015) “Sustainable energy for all status report: tracking progress in the Asia and the Pacific: A summary report,” 1st ed. Asian Development Bank. 158 p. ISBN: 978-92-9257-112-2

  15. Yaqobi MA, Matayoshi H, Danish MSS, Lotfy ME, How-lader AM, et al. (2019) “Low-voltage solid-state DC breaker for fault protection applications in isolated DC microgrid cluster” Applied Sciences (vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 723–735) https://doi.org/10.3390/app9040723

  16. Danish MSS, Matayoshi H, Howlader HOR, Chakraborty S, Mandal P, et al. (2019) “Microgrid planning and design: Resilience to sustainability” Bangkok, Thailand, IEEE

  17. Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Danish SMS, Sabory NR, K N, et al. (2019) “A recap of voltage stability indices in the past three decades” Energies (vol. 12, no. 8, pp. 1544) https://doi.org/10.3390/en12081544

  18. Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Ershad AM, Danish SMS, Yona A, et al. (2017) “Sustainable architecture and urban plan-ning trough exploitation of renewable energy” Interna-tional Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy (vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 1–7) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijrse.s.2017060301.11

  19. Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Ludin GA, Yona A, et al. (2016) “An open-door immature policy for rural electrification: A case study of Afghanistan” International Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy (vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 8–13) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijrse.s.2017060301.12

  20. Georgeson L, Maslin M (2018) “Putting the United Na-tions sustainable development goals into practice: A re-view of implementation, monitoring, and finance” Geo: Geography and Environment (vol. 5, no. 1, ) https://doi.org/10.1002/geo2.49

  21. Goal 7-Affordable and clean energy (2020) Energy - United Nations Sustainable Development (https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/energy/) Accessed: 7 April 2020

  22. Renewable energy and jobs: Annual teview 2018 (2018) Abu Dhabi, UAE, International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). (https://irena.org/-/media/Files/IRENA/Agency/Publication/2018/May/IRENA_RE_Jobs_Annual_Review_2018.pdf) Accessed: 4 July 2020

  23. Voluntary national review at the high level political forum SDGs’ - Afghanistan (2017) Progress report Kabul, Af-ghanistan, General Directorate of Policy & RBM, Ministry of Economy. (https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/16277Afghanistan.pdf) Accessed: 4 July 2020

  24. Afghanistan poverty status update – Progress at risk (2017) World Bank (https://www.worldbank.org/en/country/afghanistan/publication/afghanistan-poverty-status-update-report-2017) Accessed: 7 April 2020

  25. Najafizada SAM (2017) “Policy research institutions and the health SDGs: building momentum in South Asia” Country Report: Afghanistan Kabul, Afghanistan, Afghani-stan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU). (https://idl-bnc-idrc.dspacedirect.org/handle/10625/57091) Ac-cessed: 7 April 2020

  26. Renewables 2016: Global status report (2017) Paris, France, REN21 Secretariat. (https://www.ren21.net/wp-con-tent/uploads/2019/05/REN21_GSR2016_FullReport_en_11.pdf) Accessed: 4 July 2020

  27. Danish MSS, Funabashi T (2014) “Explicit recognition of Afghanistan’s power distribution networks problems and technical suggestions” 2014 IEEE Region 10 Conference (TENCON) Bangkok, Thailand, IEEE - pp. 1–6. https://doi.org/10.1109/TENCON.2014.7022402 (https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7022402)

  28. Ministry of Energy and Water (MEW) - Afghanistan (2017) “Afghanistan hydropower plants” (www.mew.gov.af) Accessed: 4 July 2019

  29. Afghanistan renewable energy policy (2017) (Afghani-stan Renewable Energy Policy) Accessed: 16 November 2019

  30. Statistics (2019) Global wind energy council (https://gwec.net/members-area-market-intelligence/statistics/) Accessed: 7 April 2020

  31. Country presentation - The South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) (2016)

  32. Gencer, Irving, Meier, Spencer, Wnuk C (2018) “Energy security trade-offs under high uncertainty: Resolving Af-ghanistan’s power sector development dilemma” Kabul, Afghanistan, World Bank. (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/326331194_Energy_security_trade-offs_under_high_uncertainty_Resolving_Afghanistans_power_sector_development_dilemma) Accessed: 7 April 2020

  33. Ministry of Energy and Water (MEW) - Afghanistan (2019) “MEW statistics” (http://mew.gov.af/) Accessed: 4 July 2019

  34. Global solar capacity grew faster than fossil fuels in 2017 (2018) Carbon Brief (https://www.carbonbrief.org/global-solar-capacity-grew-faster-than-fossil-fuels-2017-report) Accessed: 7 April 2020

  35. Renewable energy roadmap for Afghanistan (2015-2017) (2017) Kabul, Afghanistan, Asian Development Bank (ADB). (https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/project-document/151922/47266-001-tar.pdf) Accessed: 1 No-vember 2019

  36. Global solar atlas - Afghanistan (2019) global solar atlas (https://globalsolaratlas.info/download/afghanistan) Ac-cessed: 7 April 2020

  37. Anwarzai MA (2018) “Research and analysis of Afghani-stan’s wind, solar, and geothermal resources potential” (Doctoral Dissertation) Tokyo, Japan, Search Results Web results Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (https://tuat.repo.nii.ac.jp/?action=repository_action_common_download&item_id=1487&item_no=1&attribute_id=16&file_no=1) Accessed: 4 April 2020

  38. Danish MSS, Yona A, Senjyu T (2013) “A brief outlook of Afghanistan electricity” IEEJ Procedding Okinawa, Japan, IEEJ, vol. OKI-2013-51 -

  39. Afghanistan Independent Land Authority (2019) Devel-opment aid (https://www.developmentaid.org/) Ac-cessed: 7 April 2020

  40. Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Zaheb H, Sabory NR, Ibrahimi AM, et al. (2019) “A novel transdisciplinary paradigm for municipal solid waste to energy” Journal of Cleaner Pro-duction (vol. 233, pp. 880–892) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.05.402

  41. Danish MSS, Zaheb H, Sabory NR, Karimy H, Faiq AB, et al. (2019) “The Road Ahead for Municipal Solid Waste Management in the 21st Century: A Novel-standardized Simulated Paradigm” IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science (vol. 291, pp. 012009) https://doi.org/10.1088/1755-1315/291/1/012009

  42. Danish MSS, Senjyu T (2020) “Green building efficiency and sustainability indicators” Green building manage-ment and smart automation: , 1st ed. Pennsylvania, Unit-ed States, IGI Global - pp. 128–145. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-5225-9754-4

  43. Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Yaqobi MA, Nazari Z, Matayoshi H, et al. (2018) “The role of ICT in corruption elimination: A holistic approach”2018 IEEE 9th Annual Information Technology, Electronics and Mobile Communication Con-ference (IEMCON) Vancouver, BC, Canada, IEEE - pp. 859–864. https://doi.org/10.1109/IEMCON.2018.8614890

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published  
Energy related implications for clean, livable, and smart Kabul: A policy recommendation for the energy sector and urban sector of Afghanistan
Sabory NR, Danish MSS, and  Senjyu T.
Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution, 2020, 1 (1): 16-19  DOI 10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.03

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Cities are predicted to host 80 % of the populations by 2050 condiering the current urbanization rate. It is inevitable. No choice is left to us but to keep our cities clean and livable. Efficient use of energy is tightly linked with the smart cities. Looking at the technology development trends and the extensive need for efficient use of energy, cities must be transforming to smart ones in order to keep them clean and livable for this and generations to come. Kabul city population has been growing so rapidly and also expanding widely to its outskirts in the last two decades. Environmental footprints has been so significant and diverse. One of the critical issue with Kabul city has been the access to clean and abundant sources of Energy. At the same time, lack of a  master plan for its future has made this city in the danger of become empty from the habitants in few decades. This is very important to draw future now. Develop a new vision for our cities that is meeting the requirements of future. Kabul city needs one badly. One important area of a city to be discussed is its energy demand, supply and consumption. In this research, energy demand, sustainable sources of energy supply and consumption is thoroughly discussed. Based on our key assumption, livable and clean Kabul, all the other parameters are analyzed and suggested. In specific, we have discussed the energy demand for electricity, heating & cooling of buildings, transportation and industry. It is also assumed that Kabul will be modern and smart city with state of the art technology available all around it. Key data and references for this research are;1. Sasaki Urban Design Framework for Kabul city, 2. Previous master plans of Kabul city, 3. Energy strategies and outlooks for Afghanistan, 4. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and many other guidelines internationally used for urban planning and design. This research will help policy makers, urban planners and designers, municipality authorities, other urban issues related sectors to work jointly and make smart and rational decisions for the capital of Afghanistan and save it from going abandoned.

Citation

REPA

Sabory NR, Danish MSS, Senjyu T (2020) “Energy related implications for clean, livable and smart Kabul: A policy recommendation for the energy sector and urban sector of Afghanistan” Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 16–19) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.03

 

APA

Sabory, N. R., Danish, M. S. S., & Senjyu, T. (2020). Energy related implications for clean, livable and smart Kabul: A policy recommendation for the energy sector and urban sector of Afghanistan. Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution, 1(1), 16–19. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.03

 

MLA

Sabory, Najib Rahman, et al. “Energy Related Implications for Clean, Livable and Smart Kabul: A Policy Recommendation for the Energy Sector and Urban Sector of Afghanistan.” Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020, pp. 16–19, doi:10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.03.

 

Vancouver

Sabory NR, Danish MSS, Senjyu T. Energy related implications for clean, livable and smart Kabul: A policy recommendation for the energy sector and urban sector of Afghanistan. J Sustain Energy Rev. 2020;1(1):16–9.

 

Chicago

Sabory, Najib Rahman, Mir Sayed Shah Danish, and Tomonobu Senjyu. 2020. “Energy Related Implications for Clean, Livable and Smart Kabul: A Policy Recommendation for the Energy Sector and Urban Sector of Afghanistan.” Journal of Sustainable Energy Revolution 1 (1): 16–19. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.03.

 

Elsevier

Sabory, N.R., Danish, M.S.S., Senjyu, T., 2020. Energy related implications for clean, livable and smart Kabul: A policy recommendation for the energy sector and urban sector of Afghanistan. J. Sustain Energy Rev. 1, 16–19. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.03

 

IEEE

  1. R. Sabory, M. S. S. Danish, and T. Senjyu, “Energy related implications for clean, livable and smart Kabul: A policy recommendation for the energy sector and urban sector of Afghanistan,” J. Sustain Energy Rev., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 16–19, 2020, doi: 10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.03.

 

Springer

Sabory, N.R., Danish, M.S.S., Senjyu, T.: Energy related implications for clean, livable and smart Kabul: A policy recommendation for the energy sector and urban sector of Afghanistan. J. Sustain Energy Rev. 1, 16–19 (2020). https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jser.1.1.03.

Authors

Najib Rahman Sabory
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Mir Sayed Shah Danish

Strategic Research Projects Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan

Tomonobu Senjyu

Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan

References
  1. Dodman D, Diep L, Colenbrander S (2017) “Resilience and resource fffciency in cities” Nairobi, Kenya, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). (https://wedocs.unep.org/bitstream/handle/20.500.11822/20629/Resilience_resource_efficiency_cities.pdf?sequence=1&ampisAllowed=) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  2. Batty M, Axhausen KW, Giannotti F, Pozdnoukhov A, Bazzani A, et al. (2012) “Smart cities of the future” The European Physical Journal Special Topics (vol. 214, no. 1, pp. 481–518) https://doi.org/10.1140/epjst/e2012-01703-3

  3. United Nations (UN) (2020) “Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)” (https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdgs) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  4. Energy technology perspectives 2016: Towards sustaina-ble urban energy systems (2016) Executive summary Paris, France, International Energy Agency (IEA). (https://webstore.iea.org/download/summary/1057) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  5. World urbanization prospects (2019) The 2018 revision New York, USA, United Nations (UN). (https://population.un.org/wup/Publications/Files/WUP2018-Report.pdf) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  6. Cajot S, Peter M, Bahu J-M, Koch A, Maréchal F (2015) “Energy Planning in the Urban Context: Challenges and Perspectives” Energy Procedia (vol. 78, pp. 3366–3371) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egypro.2015.11.752

  7. Essam E. Khalil HA, Khalil EE (2019) “Energy efficiency in the urban environment,” 1st ed. Florida, USA, CRC Press. 304 p. ISBN: 978-0-367-37781-6

  8. Central Statistics Organization (CSO) (2019) “Afghani-stan statistics” (http://cso.gov.af/fa) Accessed: 1 Novem-ber 2019

  9. Huovila A, Bosch P, Airaksinen M (2019) “Comparative analysis of standardized indicators for Smart sustainable cities: What indicators and standards to use and when?” Cities (vol. 89, pp. 141–153) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cities.2019.01.029

  10. United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) (2011) “Seventeenth session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 17)” Seventeenth session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 17) (https://unfccc.int/process-and-meetings/conferences/past-conferences/durban-climate-change-conference-november-2011/cop-17) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  11. Ministry of Energy and Water (MEW) - Afghanistan (2017) “Afghanistan Renewable Energy Policy” (Afghan-istan Renewable Energy Policy) Accessed: 16 November 2019

  12. Voluntary national review at the high level political forum SDGs’ - Afghanistan (2017) Progress report Kabul, Af-ghanistan, General Directorate of Policy & RBM, Ministry of Economy. (https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/16277Afghanistan.pdf) Accessed: 4 July 2020

  13. Sasaki (2017) “Kabul urban design framework,” 1st ed. Kabul, Afghanistan, Ministry of Urban Development and Housing. (https://www.sasaki.com/projects/kabul-urban-design-framework/) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  14. Institutional Development for Energy in Afghanistan (IDEA) Programme - GIZ (2017) “Enabling PV Afghani-stan” Berlin, Germany, Institutional Development for En-ergy in Afghanistan (IDEA) Programme - GIZ. (https://www.solarwirtschaft.de/fileadmin/user_upload/report_enabling_pv_afg.pdf) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  15. Rittel HWJ, Webber MM (1973) “Dilemmas in a general theory of planning” Policy Sci (vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 155–169) https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01405730

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published    
Evaluating stream bank instability and toe erosion using BSTEM model for the Amu river 
Rasouli MO, Sadat SH, and Xenarios S.
Journal of Environmental Sciences Revolution, 2020, 1 (1): 1-6  DOI 10.37357/1068/jesr.1.1.01

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Loss of land, disputes on sharing costs, and benefits of transboundary waterways are points of debate between neighboring countries. Unfortunately, weak, undeveloped countries always suffer more than their stronger neighbors. Due to economic, political, and institutional problems, Afghanistan is one country that faces challenges to develop the potential of its water resources. Each year, Amu River flooding causes great losses of land due to massive bank degradations and erosions for up to several kilometers. Currently little progress has been made to study, research, or manage the bank erosions of the Amu River. In the absence of field data, the Bank Stability and Toe Erosion Model (BSTEM) may be used to analyze stream bank stability and toe erosion. This study was conducted to describe the Amu River stream bank using the BSTEM model for a restoration process. A field survey was conducted from February 3, 2019, to February 23, 2019; soil type, layer thickness, water table depth, and stream bank profile are entered into the BSTEM model with two different flow depths according to insights from villagers and well-diggers. Mass failure and toe erosion are two dominant mechanisms of Amu River bank failure, and the effectiveness of vegetation on bank protection is observed.

Citation

REPA

Rasouli MO, Sadat SH, Xenarios S (2020) “Evaluating stream bank instability and toe erosion using BSTEM model for the Amu river” Journal of Environmental Science Revolution (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–6) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jesr/1.1.01

 

APA

Rasouli, M. O., Sadat, S. H., & Xenarios, S. (2020). Evaluating stream bank instability and toe erosion using BSTEM model for the Amu river. Journal of Environmental Sciences Revolution, 1(1), 1–6. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jesr/1.1.01

 

MLA

Rasouli, Mohammad Omar, et al. “Evaluating Stream Bank Instability and Toe Erosion Using BSTEM Model for the Amu River.” Journal of Environmental Sciences Revolution, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020, pp. 1–6, doi:10.37357/1068/jesr/1.1.01.

 

Vancouver

Rasouli MO, Sadat SH, Xenarios S. Evaluating stream bank instability and toe erosion using BSTEM model for the Amu river. J Environ Sci Rev. 2020;1(1):1–6.

 

Chicago

Rasouli, Mohammad Omar, Sayed Hashmat Sadat, and Stefanos Xenarios. 2020. “Evaluating Stream Bank Instability and Toe Erosion Using BSTEM Model for the Amu River.” Journal of Environmental Sciences Revolution 1 (1): 1–6. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jesr/1.1.01.

 

Elsevier

Rasouli, M.O., Sadat, S.H., Xenarios, S., 2020. Evaluating stream bank instability and toe erosion using BSTEM model for the Amu river. J. Environ. Sci. Rev. 1, 1–6. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jesr/1.1.01

 

IEEE

  1. O. Rasouli, S. H. Sadat, and S. Xenarios, “Evaluating stream bank instability and toe erosion using BSTEM model for the Amu river,” J. Environ. Sci. Rev., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–6, 2020, doi: 10.37357/1068/jesr/1.1.01.

 

Springer

Rasouli, M.O., Sadat, S.H., Xenarios, S.: Evaluating stream bank instability and toe erosion using BSTEM model for the Amu river. J. Environ. Sci. Rev. 1, 1–6 (2020). https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jesr/1.1.01.

Authors

Mohammad Omar Rasouli
Department Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Sayed Hashmat Sadat
Department Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Stefanos Xenarios
Graduate School of Public Policy, Nazarbayev University, Astana, Kazakhstan

References
  1. Lavendel B (2002) “The Business of Ecological Restoration” Ecological Restoration (vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 173–178)

  2. Bernhardt ES, Palmer MA, Allan JD, Alexander G, Barnas K, et al. (2005) “Synthesizing U.S. River Restoration Efforts” Science (vol. 308, no. 5722, pp. 636–637) https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1109769

  3. Sadat SH (2015) “Modification of spur-dike with footing or pile-group to stabilize river morphology and reduce local scour” (PhD Dissertation) Nagoya, Japan, Nagoya Institute of Technology (https://nitech.repo.nii.ac.jp/?action=repository_action_common_download&item_id=3168&item_no=1&attribute_id=13&file_no=2) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  4. Langendoen Eddy J., Simon Andrew (2008) “Modeling the Evolution of Incised Streams: Streambank Erosion (Part 2)” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering (vol. 134, no. 7, pp. 905–915) https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(2008)134:7(905)

  5. Reisner DE, Pradeep T, Pradeep T (2014) “Aquananotechnology: Global Prospects,” 1st ed. Florida, United States, CRC Press. 887 p. ISBN: 978-0-429-18563-2 (https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9780429185632) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  6. Simon A, Curini A, Darby SE, Langendoen EJ (2000) “Bank and near-bank processes in an incised channel” Geomorphology (vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 193–217) https://doi.org/10.1016/S0169-555X(00)00036-2

  7. Location of study area in Amu river (2018) (https://landlook.usgs.gov/viewer.html) Accessed: 27 June 2018

  8. Land Cover, Afghanistan (FAO) (2010) Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) (http://www.un-spider.org/links-and-resources/data-sources/land-cover-afghanistan-fao) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  9. Ariathurai R, Arulanandan K (1978) “Erosion Rates of Cohesive Soils” Journal of the Hydraulics Division (vol. 104, no. 2, pp. 279–283)

  10. Klavon K, Fox G, Guertault L, Langendoen E, Enlow H, et al. (2017) “Evaluating a process-based model for use in streambank stabilization: insights on the Bank Stability and Toe Erosion Model (BSTEM)” Earth Surface Processes and Landforms (vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 191–213) https://doi.org/10.1002/esp.4073

  11. Hanson GJ, Simon A (2001) “Erodibility of cohesive streambeds in the loess area of the midwestern USA” Hydrological Processes (vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 23–38) https://doi.org/10.1002/hyp.149

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published  
Climate change impact on glacier lakes in Panjshir province of Afghanistan 
Sajood MK, and Safi AG.
Journal of Environmental Sciences Revolution, 2020, 1 (1): 7-17  DOI 10.37357/1068/jesr.1.1.02

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

The upper portion of the ‎Panjshir River watershed consists of steep mountain ‎valleys in the Hindu Kush mountain range, which reaches over 6,000 meters above sea ‎level and remains snow covered throughout the year. The Glacier Lakes there pose a potential flood risk to the Panjshir valley. As the weather is warming ‎globally, the increasing temperatures accelerate the melting rate of the ‎glacier, causing the mountain ice caps to melt and create numerous lakes. Over the last decade, two of these lakes ruptured, leaving dozens of deaths, many hectares of land farm washed out, and hundreds of houses destroyed. This study looks at the potential impact of climate change on villagers in the province.‎ Hydro-‎‎meteorological data ‎(wind, temperature, precipitation, and runoff) from five meteorological stations over the last decade were analyzed with satellite imagery. Discharge data at the outlet of this sub-basin over ten years were also analyzed with remote sensing data for higher accuracy and validity.‎ Rising regional climate temperatures have resulted in faster snow and glacier melting, causing more discharge, high evapotranspiration, and higher ‎water demand. Although precipitation decreased between 2008 and 2018, ‎discharge increased from melting glaciers.‎ Satellite imagery reveals 234 lakes in the valley; ‎‎66 lakes have potential or high potential risk to the six districts of this province, and Paryan district is at most risk.

Citation

REPA

Sajood MK, Safi AG (2020) “Climate change impact on glacier lakes in Panjshir province of Afghanistan” Journal of Environmental Science Revolution (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 7–17) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jesr/1.1.02

 

APA

Sajood, M. K., & Safi, A. G. (2020). Climate change impact on glacier lakes in Panjshir province of Afghanistan. Journal of Environmental Sciences Revolution, 1(1), 7–17. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jesr/1.1.02

 

MLA

Sajood, Mariam Khulmi, and Abdul Ghias Safi. “Climate Change Impact on Glacier Lakes in Panjshir Province of Afghanistan.” Journal of Environmental Sciences Revolution, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020, pp. 7–17, doi:10.37357/1068/jesr/1.1.02.

 

Vancouver

Sajood MK, Safi AG. Climate change impact on glacier lakes in Panjshir province of Afghanistan. J Environ Sci Rev. 2020;1(1):7–17.

 

Chicago

Sajood, Mariam Khulmi, and Abdul Ghias Safi. 2020. “Climate Change Impact on Glacier Lakes in Panjshir Province of Afghanistan.” Journal of Environmental Sciences Revolution 1 (1): 7–17. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jesr/1.1.02.

 

Elsevier

Sajood, M.K., Safi, A.G., 2020. Climate change impact on glacier lakes in Panjshir province of Afghanistan. J. Environ. Sci. Rev. 1, 7–17. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jesr/1.1.02

 

IEEE

  1. K. Sajood and A. G. Safi, “Climate change impact on glacier lakes in Panjshir province of Afghanistan,” J. Environ. Sci. Rev., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 7–17, 2020, doi: 10.37357/1068/jesr/1.1.02.

 

Springer

Sajood, M.K., Safi, A.G.: Climate change impact on glacier lakes in Panjshir province of Afghanistan. J. Environ. Sci. Rev. 1, 7–17 (2020). https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jesr/1.1.02.

Authors

Mariam Khulmi Sajood
Department of Hydrometeorology, Faculty of Geoscience, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Abdul Ghias Safi
Department of Hydrometeorology, Faculty of Geoscience, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

References
  1. Arez GJ (2007) “Afghanistan natural geography” Kabul University (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 59–71)

  2. Mir RA, Jain SK, Lohani AK, Saraf AK (2018) “Glacier recession and glacial lake outburst flood studies in Zanskar basin, western Himalaya” Journal of Hydrology (vol. 564, pp. 376–396) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2018.05.031

  3. Drenkhan F, Guardamino L, Huggel C, Frey H (2018) “Current and future glacier and lake assessment in the deglaciating Vilcanota-Urubamba basin, Peruvian Andes” Global and Planetary Change (vol. 169, pp. 105–118) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2018.07.005

  4. Puspitarini HD, François B, Zaramella M, Brown C, Borga M (2020) “The impact of glacier shrinkage on energy production from hydropower-solar complementarity in alpine river basins” Science of The Total Environment (vol. 719, pp. 137488) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.137488

  5. Carrivick JL, Tweed FS (2019) “A review of glacier outburst floods in Iceland and Greenland with a megafloods perspective” Earth-Science Reviews (vol. 196, pp. 102876) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2019.102876

  6. Sun J, Zhou T, Liu M, Chen Y, Shang H, et al. (2018) “Linkages of the dynamics of glaciers and lakes with the climate elements over the Tibetan Plateau” Earth-Science Reviews (vol. 185, pp. 308–324) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earscirev.2018.06.012

  7. Shrestha M, Koike T, Hirabayashi Y, Xue Y, Wang L, et al. (2015) “Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance-based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region” Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (vol. 120, no. 10, pp. 4889–4919) https://doi.org/10.1002/2014JD022666

  8. Taniwal MZ (2018) “Afghanistan general geography” Karwan University (vol. 59, )

  9. Sajood MK (2019) “DEM (ASTER satellite imagery); ET (Evapotranspiration), LST (Temperature) and Precipitation – Monthly satellite imagery” (https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  10. Veh G, Korup O, Walz A (2020) “Hazard from Himalayan glacier lake outburst floods” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (vol. 117, no. 2, pp. 907–912) https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1914898117

  11. Ministry of Energy and Water (MEW) - Afghanistan (2018) “Afghanistan agrometeorological bulleting” (http://mew.gov.af/) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  12. Ministry of Energy and Water (MEW) - Afghanistan (2018) “Hydrological data” (http://mew.gov.af/) Accessed: 1 November 2019

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access     Published  
Performance evaluation of different photovoltaic (PV) modules: A case study 
Mohammadi K, Sabory NR, Karimi K, Ahmadi M, Danish MSS, and Senjyu T.
Journal of Engineering and Technology Revolution, 2020, 1 (1): 1-8  DOI 10.37357/1068/jetr.1.1.01

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Climate change and global warmings are the main challenges for today and the future nations from the health and environment perspectives. Energy generation utilizing fossil fuel is the leading cause of these issues. On its opposite side, elimination or suppression of fossil fuel utilization by introducing clean and abundant renewable energy resources could be the best solution. In general, renewable energies have  low efficiency and high capital cost compared to conventional fossil fuel-based energy supply. Therefore, without considering proper approaches and techniques, it is not encouraging  to supply energy through renewable energy resources. Conquering the problem, we need to find the best method and ways to create cheap and efficient energy by renewable sources as possible. In this paper, a methodology is investigated and proposed to simultaneously save energy and cost considering useful parameters such as the effect of different modules, temperature, location, and tilt angle. An estimation-based tool developed by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) known as PV Watts, which is utilized in this paper. A 10 kW photovoltaic system with three different modules in two different locations Kabul and Kandahar in Afghanistan is selected as a case study. From the results, it is found that selection of a specific module for a specific region with different temperatures and appropriate title angles has a significant effect on the performance of photovoltaic systems. It is worthy of mention that before implementing a photovoltaic system, different aspects of the system should be evaluated using proper software/tools in order to achieve optimal energy performance. Finally, better energy system performance contributes to the attraction of investment in renewable energy resources as a clean and sustainable energy supply option.

Citation

REPA

Mohammadi K, Sabory NR, Karimi K, Ahmadi M, Danish MSS, et al. (2020) “Performance evaluation of different photovoltaic (PV) modules: A case study” Journal of Engineering and Technology Revolution (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–8) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jetr/1.1.01

 

APA

Mohammadi, K., Sabory, N. R., Karimi, K., Ahmadi, M., Danish, M. S. S., & Senjyu, T. (2020). Performance evaluation of different photovoltaic (PV) modules: A case study. Journal of Engineering and Technology Revolution, 1(1), 1–8. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jetr/1.1.01

 

MLA

Mohammadi, Khalil, et al. “Performance Evaluation of Different Photovoltaic (PV) Modules: A Case Study.” Journal of Engineering and Technology Revolution, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020, pp. 1–8, doi:10.37357/1068/jetr/1.1.01.

 

Vancouver

Mohammadi K, Sabory NR, Karimi K, Ahmadi M, Danish MSS, Senjyu T. Performance evaluation of different photovoltaic (PV) modules: A case study. J Eng Technol Rev. 2020;1(1):1–8.

 

Chicago

Mohammadi, Khalil, Najib Rahman Sabory, Kambiz Karimi, Mikaeel Ahmadi, Mir Sayed Shah Danish, and Tomonobu Senjyu. 2020. “Performance Evaluation of Different Photovoltaic (PV) Modules: A Case Study.” Journal of Engineering and Technology Revolution 1 (1): 1–8. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jetr/1.1.01.

 

Elsevier

Mohammadi, K., Sabory, N.R., Karimi, K., Ahmadi, M., Danish, M.S.S., Senjyu, T., 2020. Performance evaluation of different photovoltaic (PV) modules: A case study. J. Eng. Technol. Rev. 1, 1–8. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jetr/1.1.01

 

IEEE

  1. Mohammadi, N. R. Sabory, K. Karimi, M. Ahmadi, M. S. S. Danish, and T. Senjyu, “Performance evaluation of different photovoltaic (PV) modules: A case study,” J. Eng. Technol. Rev., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–8, 2020, doi: 10.37357/1068/jetr/1.1.01.

 

Springer

Mohammadi, K., Sabory, N.R., Karimi, K., Ahmadi, M., Danish, M.S.S., Senjyu, T.: Performance evaluation of different photovoltaic (PV) modules: A case study. J. Eng. Technol. Rev. 1, 1–8 (2020). https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jetr/1.1.01.

Authors

Khalil Mohammadi
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Najib Rahman Sabory
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Kambiz Karimi
Department of Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Mikaeel Ahmadi
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan

Mir Sayed Shah Danish
Strategic Research Projects Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan

Tomonobu Senjyu
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan

References
  1. Danish MSS, Yona A, Senjyu T (2014) “Pre-design and life cycle cost analysis of a hybrid power system for rural and remote communities in Afghanistan” The Journal of Engineering-IET (vol. 2014, no. 8, pp. 438–444) https://doi.org/10.1049/joe.2014.0172

  2. Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Ludin GA, Yona A, et al. (2016) “An Open-door Immature Policy for Rural Electrification: A Case Study of Afghanistan” International Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy (vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 8–13) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijrse.s.2017060301.12

  3. Yaqobi MA, Matayoshi H, Danish MSS, Urakaki N, Howlader AM, et al. (2018) “Control and Energy Management Strategy of Standalone DC Microgrid Cluster using PV and Battery Storage for Rural Application” International Journal of Power and Energy Research (vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 53–68) https://doi.org/10.22606/ijper.2018.24001

  4. Susowake Y, Ibrahimi AM, Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Howlader AM, et al. (2018) “Multi-Objective Design of Power System Introducing Seawater Electrolysis Plant for Remote Island” IEEE Innovative Smart Grid Technologies - Asia (ISGT Asia) Singapore, Singapore, IEEE - pp. 908–911. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISGT-Asia.2018.8467912 (https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8467912)

  5. Tobaru S, Muarapaz CC, Conteh F, Senjyu T, Howlader AM, et al. (2016) “Design of hybrid renewable energy systems considering optimal real-time pricing” 2016 IEEE Region 10 Conference (TENCON) Singapore, Singapore, IEEE - pp. 3206–3209. https://doi.org/10.1109/TENCON.2016.7848641 (https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7848641)

  6. Ahmadi M, Lotfy ME, Howlader AM, Yona A, Senjyu T (2019) “Centralised multi-objective integration of wind farm and battery energy storage system in real-distribution network considering environmental, technical and economic perspective” Transmission Distribution IET Generation (vol. 13, no. 22, pp. 5207–5217) https://doi.org/10.1049/iet-gtd.2018.6749

  7. Danish MSS, Matayoshi H, Howlader HOR, Chakraborty S, Mandal P, et al. (2019) “Microgrid Planning and Design: Resilience to Sustainability” 2019 IEEE PES GTD Grand International Conference and Exposition Asia (GTD Asia) Bangkok, Thailand, IEEE - pp. 253–258. https://doi.org/10.1109/GTDAsia.2019.8716010

  8. Danish MSS, Sabory NR, Ershad AM, Danish SMS, Yona A, et al. (2017) “Sustainable Architecture and Urban Planning trough Exploitation of Renewable Energy” International Journal of Sustainable and Green Energy (vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 1–7) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijrse.s.2017060301.11

  9. Ahmadi M, Lotfy ME, Danish MSS, Ryuto S, Yona A, et al. (2019) “Optimal multi-configuration and allocation of SVR, capacitor, centralised wind farm, and energy storage system: a multi-objective approach in a real distribution network” IET Renewable Power Generation (vol. 13, no. 5, pp. 762–773) https://doi.org/10.1049/iet-rpg.2018.5057

  10. Ahmadi M, Lotfy ME, Shigenobu R, Yona A, Senjyu T (2018) “Optimal sizing and placement of rooftop solar photovoltaic at Kabul city real distribution network” Transmission Distribution IET Generation (vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 303–309) https://doi.org/10.1049/iet-gtd.2017.0687

  11. Chikate BV, Sadawarte Y (2015) “The factors affecting the performance of solar cell” International journal of computer applications (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 0975–8887)

  12. Jain D, Lalwani M (2017) “A Review on Optimal Inclination Angles for Solar Arrays” International Journal of Renewable Energy Research (IJRER) (vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 1053–1061)

  13. Deb SK (2000) “Chapter 584 - Recent Developments in High-Efficiency PV Cells” In: Sayigh AAM - editor. World Renewable Energy Congress VI Oxford, Pergamon - pp. 2658–2663. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-008043865-8/50584-5

  14. Nair KK, Jose J, Ravindran A (2016) “Analysis of temperature dependent parameters on solar cell efficiency using MATLAB” (vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 6)

  15. Jäger K-D, Isabella O, Smets AHM, Swaaij RACMM van, Zeman M (2016) “Solar energy: fundamentals, technology and systems” p. ISBN: 978-1-906860-73-8

  16. Masters GM (2004) “Renewable and Efficient Electric Power Systems,” 2nd ed. USA, Wiley. 647 p. ISBN: 0-471-28060-7 (http://www.a-ghadimi.com/files/Courses/RenewableEnergy/REN_Book.pdf)

  17. PVWATTS free solar calculator (2019) Photovoltaic Software (https://photovoltaic-software.com/pv-softwares-calculators/online-free-photovoltaic-software/pvwatts-nrel) Accessed: 9 April 2020

  18. Dash PK, Gupta NC (2015) “Effect of temperature on power output from different commercially available photovoltaic modules” International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications (vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 148–151)

  19. Singh P, Ravindra NM (2012) “Temperature dependence of solar cell performance: An analysis” Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells (vol. 101, pp. 36–45) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.solmat.2012.02.019

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published  
Active substation design for distributed generation integration in Afghanistan’s grid 
Joya AJ ,and Shirani H.
Journal of Engineering and Technology Revolution, 2020, 1 (1): 9-15  DOI 10.37357/1068/jetr/1.1.02

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Energy has been harvested from water, wind and solar as isolated distributed generation (DG) to electrify rural households and villages in Afghanistan. Several solar PV and wind farms have been or planned to be built as isolated distributed generators in those provinces that have no access to national grid.  While it is ideal that the national electrical grid be extended to those provinces and regions, these distributed generators are not compatible with the operating voltage specifications of the national grid. In this study, we have focused on changing the topology of distribution grid at the planning and design stage by introducing active devices to control voltage, especially in the weak nodes of the grid. At substations which convert DG to MV/LV, using two active devices such as On Load Tap Changing-Phase Shifting Transformer (OLTC-PST) and Static Synchronize Compensator (STATCOM) should be considered in the design. The integration a 1-MW wind power distributed generator in Panjshir province of Afghanistan with the national grid network is considered. Introducing these active devices that increases the installed DG power in weak networks is analyzed. An operation and control strategy for the Active Substation is verified by temporal power flow simulations. The results show that using these active devices can increase the active power injection capability in weak networks.

Citation

REPA

Joya AJ, Shirani H (2020) “Active substation design for distributed generation integration in Afghanistan’s grid” Journal of Engineering and Technology Revolution  (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 9–15) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jetr.1.1.02

 

APA

Joya, A. J., & Shirani, H. (2020). Active substation design for distributed generation integration in Afghanistan’s grid. Journal of Engineering and Technology Revolution, 1(1), 9–15. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jetr.1.1.02

 

MLA

Joya, Ali Jan, and Habiburahman Shirani. “Active Substation Design for Distributed Generation Integration in Afghanistan’s Grid.” Journal of Engineering and Technology Revolution, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020, pp. 9–15, doi:10.37357/1068/jetr.1.1.02.

 

Vancouver

Joya AJ, Shirani H. Active substation design for distributed generation integration in Afghanistan’s grid. J Eng Technol Rev. 2020;1(1):9–15.

 

Chicago

Joya, Ali Jan, and Habiburahman Shirani. 2020. “Active Substation Design for Distributed Generation Integration in Afghanistan’s Grid.” Journal of Engineering and Technology Revolution 1 (1): 9–15. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jetr.1.1.02.

 

Elsevier

Joya, A.J., Shirani, H., 2020. Active substation design for distributed generation integration in Afghanistan’s grid. J. Eng. Technol. Rev. 1, 9–15. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jetr.1.1.02

 

IEEE

  1. J. Joya and H. Shirani, “Active substation design for distributed generation integration in Afghanistan’s grid,” J. Eng. Technol. Rev., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 9–15, 2020, doi: 10.37357/1068/jetr.1.1.02.

 

Springer

Joya, A.J., Shirani, H.: Active substation design for distributed generation integration in Afghanistan’s grid. J. Eng. Technol. Rev. 1, 9–15 (2020). https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jetr.1.1.02.

Authors

Ali Jan Joya
Ministry of Energy and Water, Kabul, Afghanistan

Habiburahman Shirani
Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

References
  1. Danish MSS, Senjyu T, Sabory NR, Danish SMS, Ludin GA, et al. (2017) “Afghanistan’s aspirations for energy independence: Water resources and hydropower energy” Renewable Energy (vol. 113, pp. 1276–1287) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2017.06.090

  2. Ahmadzai S, McKinna A (2018) “Afghanistan electrical energy and trans-boundary water systems analyses: Challenges and opportunities” Energy Reports (vol. 4, pp. 435–469) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egyr.2018.06.003

  3. Ministry of Energy and Water (MEW) - Afghanistan (2019) “MEW Statistics” (http://mew.gov.af/) Accessed: 4 July 2020

  4. Hallett M (2009) “Distributed power in Afghanistan: The Padisaw micro-hydro project” Renewable Energy (vol. 34, no. 12, pp. 2847–2851) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2009.06.001

  5. Martins VF, Borges CLT (2011) “Active Distribution Network Integrated Planning Incorporating Distributed Generation and Load Response Uncertainties” IEEE Transactions on Power Systems (vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 2164–2172) https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2011.2122347

  6. Verboomen J, Van Hertem D, Schavemaker PH, Kling WL, Belmans R (2005) “Phase shifting transformers: principles and applications” 2005 International Conference on Future Power Systems Amsterdam, Netherlands, IEEE - pp. 1–6. https://doi.org/10.1109/FPS.2005.204302

  7. Siddiqui AS, Khan S, Ahsan S, Khan MI, Annamalai (2012) “Application of phase shifting transformer in Indian Network” 2012 International Conference on Green Technologies (ICGT) Trivandrum, India, IEEE - pp. 186–191. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICGT.2012.6477970

  8. El-Moursi MS, Sharaf AM (2005) “Novel controllers for the 48-pulse VSC STATCOM and SSSC for voltage regulation and reactive power compensation” IEEE Transactions on Power Systems (vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 1985–1997) https://doi.org/10.1109/TPWRS.2005.856996

  9. Goikoetxea A, Barrena JA, Rodriguez MA, Abad G (2009) “Active substation design to maximize DG integration” 2009 IEEE Bucharest PowerTech Bucharest, Romania, IEEE - pp. 1–6. https://doi.org/10.1109/PTC.2009.5282156

  10. Rao P, Crow ML, Yang Z (2000) “STATCOM control for power system voltage control applications” IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery (vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 1311–1317) https://doi.org/10.1109/61.891520

  11. Shahzad U, Asgarpoor S (2017) “A Comprehensive Review of Protection Schemes for Distributed Generation” Energy and Power Engineering (vol. 9, no. 8, pp. 430–463) https://doi.org/10.4236/epe.2017.98029

  12. Chetty A, Shoaib M, Sreedevi A (2014) “An Overview of Distributed Generation” International Journal of Modern Engineeirng Research (vol. 4, no. 6, pp. 35–41)

  13. Padiyar KR (2007) “FACTS Controllers in Power Transmission and Distribution,” 1st ed. New Delhi, India, New Age International (P) Ltd. p. ISBN: 978-81-224-2541-3

  14. Zayandehroodi H, Mohamed A, Shareef H, Mohammadjafari M (2011) “Distributed Generator and Their Effects on Distribution System Protection Performance” Australian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences (vol. 5, no. 10, pp. 398–405)

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published  
Socio-economic barriers to children’s education in Afghanistan: A case study of Kabul city 
Khan AB.
Journal of Business and Management Revolution, 2020, 1 (1): 1-9  DOI 10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Having been a war zone for the last four decades, Afghanistan is one of the developing countries where affordable access to quality education is still a dream for many of its people. According to the 2017 UNICEF Annual Report, over 40% (3.7 million) of school-age children were out of school in Afghanistan. In order to better design projects and programs that are working towards reducing this number, it is necessary first to understand the root causes of the issue. The objective of this research is to assess and analyze some of the various social and economic barriers that keep children out of school in Kabul City and hence, offer additional key information and recommendations for limiting this critical issue. Primary data of 300 children were collected through a survey conducted randomly in Kabul City. The target population of this survey were working children (between the ages of 5 and 18) and parents from households of different ethnic, linguistic, and regional backgrounds. Poverty and cultural limitations were found to be the most common factors preventing Afghan children from going to school. Other factors like access, physical disability, guardian’s type and education level, lack of infrastructure, child labor, and gender discrimination may also contribute to this issue. Results of the analysis suggest that government agencies can play a significant role in facilitating affordable access to quality education for all children by extending coverage of public schools, offering reasonable financial grants for poor families in order to avoid the need for child labor, and bringing necessary legal reforms in the traditional norms to discourage child marriage and gender discrimination.

Citation

REPA

Khan AB (2020) “Socio-economic barriers to children’s education in Afghanistan:  A case study of Kabul city” Journal of Management and Business Revolution (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–9) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01

 

APA

Khan, A. B. (2020). Socio-economic barriers to children’s education in Afghanistan: A case study of Kabul city. Journal of Business and Management Revolution, 1(1), 1–9. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01

 

MLA

Khan, Abdul Baseer. “Socio-Economic Barriers to Children’s Education in Afghanistan:  A Case Study of Kabul City.” Journal of Business and Management Revolution, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020, pp. 1–9. Zotero, doi:10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01.

 

Vancouver

Khan AB. Socio-economic barriers to children’s education in Afghanistan:  A case study of Kabul city. J Bus Manage Rev. 2020;1(1):1–9.

 

Chicago

Khan, Abdul Baseer. 2020. “Socio-Economic Barriers to Children’s Education in Afghanistan:  A Case Study of Kabul City.” Journal of Business and Management Revolution 1 (1): 1–9. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01.

 

Elsevier

Khan, A.B., 2020. Socio-economic barriers to children’s education in Afghanistan:  A case study of Kabul city. J. Bus. Manage. Rev. 1, 1–9. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01

 

IEEE

  1. B. Khan, “Socio-economic barriers to children’s education in Afghanistan:  A case study of Kabul city,” J. Bus. Manage. Rev., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–9, 2020, doi: 10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01.

 

Springer

Khan, A.B.: Socio-economic barriers to children’s education in Afghanistan:  A case study of Kabul city. J. Bus. Manage. Rev. 1, 1–9 (2020). https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.01.

Authors

Abdul Baseer Khan
Department of Business, Faculty of Business Administration, American University of Afghanistan (AUAF), Kabul, Afghanistan

References
  1. All in school and learning: Global Initiative on out-of-school children – Afghanistan country study (2018) Afghanistan country study Kabul, Afghanistan, Ministry of Education, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (unicef). (https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/afg-report-oocs2018.pdf) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  2. Central Statistics Organization (CSO) - Afghanistan (2018) “Afghanistan living conditions survey (2016-2017)” Analysis report Kabul, Afghanistan, Central Statistics Organization (CSO) of Afghanistan. (https://washdata.org/sites/default/files/documents/reports/2018-07/AfghanistanALCS2016-17Analysisreport.pdf) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  3. Auturupane H, Gunatilake R, Shojo M, Ebenezer R (2013) “Education attainment in Afghanistan: An economic analysis” Discussion Paper Series Washington DC., USA, The World Bank. (https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/16285) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  4. Lin T, Lv H (2017) “The effects of family income on children’s education: An empirical analysis of CHNS data” Proceeding on the 4th International Conference on Information Technology and Career Education Asian Academic Press - pp. 49–54. https://doi.org/10.24104/rmhe/2017.04.02002

  5. Hunte P (2006) “Looking beyond the school walls: Household decision-making and school enrolment in Afghanistan” Briefing Paper Kabul, Afghanistan, Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU). (https://areu.org.af/publication/607/) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  6. Guimbert S, Miwa K, Thanh Nguyen D (2008) “Back to school in Afghanistan: Determinants of school enrollment” International Journal of Educational Development (vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 419–434) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijedudev.2007.11.004

  7. Shayan Z (2015) “Gender Inequality in Education in Afghanistan: Access and Barriers” Open Journal of Philosophy (vol. 05, no. 05, pp. 277–284) https://doi.org/10.4236/ojpp.2015.55035

  8. From access to equality: empowering girls and women through literacy and secondary education (2012) Paris, France, United Nations Education, Science and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). (https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000218450) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  9. Pherali T, Sahar A (2018) “Learning in the chaos: A political economy analysis of education in Afghanistan” Research in Comparative and International Education (vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 239–258) https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918781882

  10. Berry J de, Fazili A, Farhad S, Nasiry F, Hashemi S, et al. (2003) “The children of Kabul: Discussions with Afghan families” Kabul, Afghanistan, Save the Children Federation, Inc. (https://resourcecentre.savethechildren.net/node/2601/pdf/2601.pdf) Accessed: 1 November 2019

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published  
Hypothesizing resurgence of financial inclusion to reduce poverty in Afghanistan 
Azimi MN.
Journal of Business and Management Revolution, 2020, 1 (1): 10-13  DOI 10.37357/1068/jbmr.1.1.02

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Reducing poverty is a critical topic of policy discussion across the world. Developing countries and post-conflict environments commonly face poverty growth. At present, Afghanistan is experiencing the highest rate of poverty in the world; only one tenth of the Afghan population has access to financial services that are mostly localized within the capital and regional cities. In this paper I hypothesize financial inclusion as a contextualized model that can significantly reduce the rate of poverty. I use a set of timeseries data on financial inclusion determinants excluding insurance as the explanatory variables and linearly regress them on the rate of poverty from 2004 to 2018. The statistical results reveal that ATMs per 100,000 adults in the country significantly reduce poverty by 0.25% by increasing capital mobility and remittances. Credit cards and borrowing facilities to the informal economy have significant coefficients of 0.00635% and 0.0207% respectively on poverty reduction as an emergent strategy. The security variable has a significant coefficient of 41% reduction of poverty. Among all other variables tested, extending mobile money facilities is also significant and reduces poverty by 0.015%.

Citation

REPA

Azimi MN (2020) “Hypothesizing resurgence of financial inclusion to reduce poverty in Afghanistan” Journal of Management and Business Revolution (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 10–13) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jmbr.1.1.02

 

APA

Azimi, M. N. (2020). Hypothesizing resurgence of financial inclusion to reduce poverty in Afghanistan. Journal of Business and Management Revolution, 1(1), 10–13. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jmbr.1.1.02

 

MLA

Azimi, Mohammad Naim. “Hypothesizing Resurgence of Financial Inclusion to Reduce Poverty in Afghanistan.” Journal of Business and Management Revolution, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020, pp. 10–13, doi:10.37357/1068/jmbr.1.1.02.

 

Vancouver

Azimi MN. Hypothesizing resurgence of financial inclusion to reduce poverty in Afghanistan. J Bus Manage Rev. 2020;1(1):10–3.

 

Chicago

Azimi, Mohammad Naim. 2020. “Hypothesizing Resurgence of Financial Inclusion to Reduce Poverty in Afghanistan.” Journal of Business and Management Revolution 1 (1): 10–13. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jmbr.1.1.02.

 

Elsevier

Azimi, M.N., 2020. Hypothesizing resurgence of financial inclusion to reduce poverty in Afghanistan. J. Bus. Manage. Rev. 1, 10–13. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jmbr.1.1.02

 

IEEE

  1. N. Azimi, “Hypothesizing resurgence of financial inclusion to reduce poverty in Afghanistan,” J. Bus. Manage. Rev., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 10–13, 2020, doi: 10.37357/1068/jmbr.1.1.02.

 

Springer

Azimi, M.N.: Hypothesizing resurgence of financial inclusion to reduce poverty in Afghanistan. J. Bus. Manage. Rev. 1, 10–13 (2020). https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jmbr.1.1.02.

Authors

Mohammad Naim Azimi
Department of Statistics and Econometrics, Faculty of Economics, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

References
  1. Ayub M (2013) “Poverty and Inequality” Global Journal of Emerging Market Economies (vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 329–346) https://doi.org/10.1177/0974910113505796

  2. Chibba M (2009) “Financial inclusion, poverty reduction and the millennium development goals” European Journal of Development Research (vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 213–230) https://doi.org/10.1057/ejdr.2008.17

  3. Kapoor A (2014) “Financial inclusion and the future of the Indian economy” Futures (vol. 56, pp. 35–42) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.futures.2013.10.007

  4. Morgan P, Pontines V (2014) “Financial Stability and Financial Inclusion”

  5. Donovan K (2012) “Mobile Money for Financial Inclusion” Information and Communications for Development, World Bank Group (pp. 61–73) https://doi.org/10.1596/9780821389911_ch04

  6. Finance M of (2018) “National Financial Inclusion Strategy”

  7. Ghosh J (2013) “Microfinance and the challenge of financial inclusion for development” Cambridge Journal of Economics (vol. 37, no. 6, pp. 1203–1219) https://doi.org/10.1093/cje/bet042

  8. Mader P (2018) “Contesting Financial Inclusion” Development and Change (vol. 49, no. 2, pp. 461–483) https://doi.org/10.1111/dech.12368

  9. Zins A, Weill L (2016) “The determinants of financial inclusion in Africa” Review of Development Finance (vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 46–57) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rdf.2016.05.001

  10. Fungáčová Z, Weill L (2014) “Understanding financial inclusion in China” China Economic Review (vol. 34, pp. 196–206) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chieco.2014.12.004

  11. Demirguc-kunt, A., and Klapper L (2012) “Measuring financial inclusion. The Global findex database” p. ISBN: 978-0-8213-9509-7

  12. Breusch TS, Pagan AR (1979) “A Simple Test for Heteroscedasticity and Random Coefficient Variation” Econometrica (vol. 47, no. 5, pp. 1287–1294) https://doi.org/10.2307/1911963

  13. Jarque CM, Bera AK (1980) “Efficient tests for normality, homoscedasticity and serial independence of regression residuals” Economics Letters (vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 255–259) https://doi.org/10.1016/0165-1765(80)90024-5

  14. Collier P (2007) “Poverty reduction in Africa” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America pp. 16763–16768. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0611702104

  15. Allen F, Carletti E, Cull R, Qian JQJ, Senbet L, et al. (2014) “The African financial development and financial inclusion gaps” Journal of African Economies (vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 614–642) https://doi.org/10.1093/jae/eju015

  16. Soederberg S (2013) “Universalising Financial Inclusion and the Securitisation of Development” Third World Quarterly (vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 593–612) https://doi.org/10.1080/01436597.2013.786285

  17. Beck T, Senbet L, Simbanegavi W (2015) “Financial Inclusion and Innovation in Africa: An Overview” Journal of African Economies (vol. 24, no. 1, pp. i3–i11) https://doi.org/10.1093/jae/eju031

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published   
Effect of harvesting stages and postharvest treatments on shelf life and quality of tomato (Lycoper-sicon esculentum Mill. var. Pearson) stored under ZECC condition
Hakimi SS, Dubey N, and Saharawat YS.
Journal of Ecoscience and Plant Revolution, 2020, 1 (1): 1-8  DOI 10.37357/1068/jepr.1.1.01

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) is one of the important commercial high value crops of Afghanistan. Among the different local varieties grown in Afghanistan, the “Pearson” variety is most popular because of its good commercial value due to its uniform globe shape and medium to large size. The study is conducted to understand the effects of different harvesting stages and postharvest treatments on the shelf life and postharvest quality of tomatoes (Pearson variety) stored under the Pusa Zero Energy Cool Chamber (ZECC) at the research farm of Agriculture Faculty, Kabul University. This is the first time that ZECC is introduced in Afghanistan for enhancing fruit shelf life. The standard dimension ZECC was built with 165 x 115 x 67.6 cm dimensions. After harvesting tomatoes at different maturity stages (Turning, Pink, and Light red color stages), fruits were precooled, graded, and treated with different concentrations of CaCl2 and mint leaf extract solutions. Thereafter, the tomatoes were placed in plastic baskets and stored in the Zero Energy Cool Chamber. During storage period, Total Soluble Solids (TSS, 0brix), pH, firmness (gr cm-2), shelf life, pericarp thickness (mm), fruit volume (cc), and fruit density were recorded. Two factorial CRD design was considered with harvesting stages as the first factor and postharvest treatments as the second factor. The data revealed that the shelf life of tomatoes was extended up to 29 days under T2 (turning color fruits treated with 6% CaCl2) and followed by T8 (turning color fruits treated with 6% CaCl2 + 6% mint Leaves extract) up to 28 days. Under T2, quality parameters such as TSS and pH increased from 3.85%brix and 2.85 to 4.4 0brix and 3.4, respectively. Firmness, pericarp and volume decreased from 1750 grcm-2, 0.75cm and 135 cc to 840 grcm-2, 0.67cm and 127 cc, respectively. At the last observation, density remained unchanged (1.00 gr/cc).  In conclusion, tomatoes harvested at the turning-color stage treated with 6% CaCl2 and followed by 6% CaCl2 + 6% mint leaves’ extract had a significant effect on the enhancement of shelf life and quality of tomatoes under ZECC condition.

Citation

REPA

Hakimi SS, Dubey N, Saharawat YS (2020) “Effect of harvesting stages and postharvest treatments on shelf life and quality of tomato (Ly- copersicon esculentum Mill. var. Pearson) stored under ZECC condition” Journal of Ecoscience and Plant Revolution (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–8) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jepr/1.1.01

 

APA

Hakimi, S. S., Dubey, N., & Saharawat, Y. S. (2020). Effect of harvesting stages and postharvest treatments on shelf life and quality of tomato (Ly- copersicon esculentum Mill. Var. Pearson) stored under ZECC condition. Journal of Ecoscience and Plant Revolution, 1(1), 1–8. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jepr/1.1.01

 

MLA

Hakimi, Sayed Samiullah, et al. “Effect of Harvesting Stages and Postharvest Treatments on Shelf Life and Quality of Tomato (Ly- Copersicon Esculentum Mill. Var. Pearson) Stored under ZECC Condition.” Journal of Ecoscience and Plant Revolution, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020, pp. 1–8, doi:10.37357/1068/jepr/1.1.01.

 

Vancouver

Hakimi SS, Dubey N, Saharawat YS. Effect of harvesting stages and postharvest treatments on shelf life and quality of tomato (Ly- copersicon esculentum Mill. var. Pearson) stored under ZECC condition. J Ecosci Plant Rev. 2020;1(1):1–8.

 

Chicago

Hakimi, Sayed Samiullah, Neeru Dubey, and Yashpal Singh Saharawat. 2020. “Effect of Harvesting Stages and Postharvest Treatments on Shelf Life and Quality of Tomato (Ly- Copersicon Esculentum Mill. Var. Pearson) Stored under ZECC Condition.” Journal of Ecoscience and Plant Revolution 1 (1): 1–8. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jepr/1.1.01.

 

Elsevier

Hakimi, S.S., Dubey, N., Saharawat, Y.S., 2020. Effect of harvesting stages and postharvest treatments on shelf life and quality of tomato (Ly- copersicon esculentum Mill. var. Pearson) stored under ZECC condition. J. Ecosci. Plant Rev. 1, 1–8. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jepr/1.1.01

 

IEEE

  1. S. Hakimi, N. Dubey, and Y. S. Saharawat, “Effect of harvesting stages and postharvest treatments on shelf life and quality of tomato (Ly- copersicon esculentum Mill. var. Pearson) stored under ZECC condition,” J. Ecosci. Plant Rev., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–8, 2020, doi: 10.37357/1068/jepr/1.1.01.

 

Springer

Hakimi, S.S., Dubey, N., Saharawat, Y.S.: Effect of harvesting stages and postharvest treatments on shelf life and quality of tomato (Ly- copersicon esculentum Mill. var. Pearson) stored under ZECC condition. J. Ecosci. Plant Rev. 1, 1–8 (2020). https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jepr/1.1.01.

Authors

Sayed Samiullah Hakimi
Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Agriculture, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

Neeru Dubey
Amity International Centre for Post-Harvest Technology and Cold Chain Management, Faculty of Horticulture, Amity University, Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India

Yashpal Singh Saharawat
Department of Soil Science and Agriculture Chemistry (SSAC), Department of Soil Science, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, India

References
  1. Agriculture Statistic Department (2017) Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock (https://www.mail.gov.af/en) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  2. Saraswathy S, Preethi TL, Balasubramanyan S, Suresh J, Revathy N, et al. (2008) “Postharvest management of horticultural crops,” 1st ed. Rajasthan, India, Agrobios (India). 577 p. ISBN: 978-81-7754-322-3

  3. Arthur E, Oduro I, Kumah P (2015) “Postharvest Quality Response of Tomato (Lycopersicon Esculentum, Mill) Fruits to Different Concentrations of Calcium Chloride at Different Dip- Times” American Journal of Food and Nutrition (pp. 1–8)

  4. Al-Sum BA, Al-Arfaj AA (2014) “Antimicrobial Activity of the Aqueous Extract of Mint Plant” Science Journal of Clinical Medicine (vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 110) https://doi.org/10.11648/j.sjcm.20130203.19

  5. Moghaddam M, Pourbaige M, Tabar HK, Farhadi N, Hosseini SMA (2013) “Composition and Antifungal Activity of Peppermint (Mentha piperita) Essential Oil from Iran” Journal of Essential Oil Bearing Plants (vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 506–512) https://doi.org/10.1080/0972060X.2013.813265

  6. A LB, Dv S, V B (2011) “Evaporative cooling system for storage of fruits and vegetables - a review.” J Food Sci Technol (vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 429–442) https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-011-0311-6

  7. Islam MP, Morimoto T, Hatou K (2012) “Storage behavior of tomato inside a zero energy cool chamber” Agricultural Engineering International: CIGR Journal (vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 209–217)

  8. Islam MP, Morimoto T (2012) “Zero Energy Cool Chamber for Extending the Shelf-Life of Tomato and Eggplant” Japan Agricultural Research Quarterly: JARQ (vol. 46, no. 3, pp. 257–267) https://doi.org/10.6090/jarq.46.257

  9. Abiso E, Satheesh N, Hailu A (2015) “Effect of storage methods and ripening stages on postharvest quality of tomato (Lycopersicom esculentum Mill) cv. Chali” Annals. Food Science and Technology 2015 Targoviste, Romania, Valahia University Press, vol. 16 - pp. 127–137. (https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/9809/8738e65c315b8a4efc4c4adede4d821448ac.pdf?_ga=2.219181342.643294641.1587536878-321628801.1585267670) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  10. Casierra-Posada F, Aguilar-Avendaño ÓE (2008) “Quality of tomato fruits (Solanum lycopersicum L.) harvested at different maturity stages” Agronomía Colombiana (vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 300–307)

  11. Dhall RK, Singh P (2013) “Effect of Ethephon and Ethylene Gas on Ripening and Quality of Tomato (Solanum Lycopersicum L.) during Cold Storage” Journal of Nutrition & Food Sciences (vol. 3, no. 6, pp. 1–7) https://doi.org/10.4172/2155-9600.1000244

  12. Dumas Y, Dadomo M, Lucca GD, Grolier P (2003) “Effects of environmental factors and agricultural techniques on antioxidantcontent of tomatoes” Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture (vol. 83, no. 5, pp. 369–382) https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.1370

  13. Parker R, Maalekuu B (2013) “The effect of harvesting stage on fruit quality and shelf-life of four tomato cultivars (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill)” Agriculture and Biology Journal of North America (vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 252–259) https://doi.org/10.5251/abjna.2013.4.3.252.259

  14. Chepngeno J, Owino W, Kinyuru J, Nenguwo N (2016) “Effect of Calcium Chloride and Hydrocooling on Postharvest Quality of Selected Vegetables” Journal of Food Research (vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 23–40) https://doi.org/10.5539/jfr.v5n2p23

  15. Senevirathna P, Daundasekera W a. M (2010) “Effect of postharvest calcium chloride vacuum infiltration on the shelf life and quality of tomato (cv. ’Thilina’)” Ceylon Journal of Science (Biological Sciences) (vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 35–44) https://doi.org/10.4038/cjsbs.v39i1.2351

  16. Pinheiro SCF, Almeida DPF (2008) “Modulation of tomato pericarp firmness through pH and calcium: Implications for the texture of fresh-cut fruit” Postharvest Biology and Technology (vol. 47, no. 1, pp. 119–125) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.postharvbio.2007.06.002

  17. Wu T, Abbott JA (2002) “Firmness and force relaxation characteristics of tomatoes stored intact or as slices” Postharvest Biology and Technology (vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 59–68) https://doi.org/10.1016/S0925-5214(01)00133-8

  18. Moneruzzaman KM, Hossain ABMS, Sani W, Saifuddin M, Alenazi M (2009) “Effect of harvesting and storage conditions on the post harvest quality of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) cv. Roma VF” Australian Journal of Crop Science (vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 113–121)

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

 Journal Article (Special Issue)     Open Access      Published  
Effect of cultural practices on quality and yield of onion (Allium cepa L. Var. Safid e Paisaye)
Salari H, Hansra BS, Saharwat YS.
Journal of Ecoscience and Plant Revolution, 2020, 1 (1): 9-14  DOI 10.37357/1068/jepr.1.1.02

Abstract
PDF
Citation
Authors
References
Acknowledgment
Abstract

Onion (Allium cepa L.) is among the most cultivated vegetable crops in the world. Afghanistan is thought to be the origin as several local and wild varieties are found in different parts of the country. Safid e Paisaye is a local variety grown in central parts of Afghanistan in the Ghorband valley. This variety has long storability and high market demand among restaurants in the region, but little research has been done to increase the quality and its availability to the market to increase its market share in Afghanistan. Conducted under supervision of Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Noida, India, at Agriculture Faculty Research Farm of Kabul University, this investigation looks at plough depth, land preparation methods, and planting date on quality and yield of onion bulb; it also studied other cultural practices including irrigation and fertilization dose and frequency. The parameters studied in this investigation include neck diameter (cm), bulb diameter (cm), neck to bulb ratio, bulb weight (gr), bulb volume (cm3), bulb density (gr/cm3), Total Soluble Solids (TSS) (Brix), firmness (Kg/cm2), marketable yield (MT/Ha), and total yield (MT/Ha). The data revealed that planting date has significant influence on bulb quality and yield of onion. The highest bulb diameter (6.95 cm), bulb weight (121 gr), bulb volume (128 cm3), marketable yield (32.54 MT/Ha), and total yield (34.24 MT/Ha) and the lowest neck to bulb ratio (0.04) were recorded for the first planting date (seed sown in nursery on 10 March - seedlings planted in field on 10 May). Land preparation methods only had significant influence on marketable yield; the highest marketable yield (26.90 MT/Ha) was recorded for flat bed land preparation method. Plough depth had no significant influence on onion quality and yield. Bulb density, TSS,and firmness were not significantly influenced by factors studied in this investigation. Conclusions: early sowing and planting of onion variety Safid e paisaye can significantly increase yield and productivity. Flat bed land preparation method is more suitable for higher productivity of onion variety Safid e Paisaye as compared to raised beds.

Citation

REPA

Salari H, Hansra BS, Saharwat YS (2020) “Effect of cultural practices on quality and yield of onion (Allium cepa L. Var. Safid e Paisaye)” Journal of Ecoscience and Plant Revolution (vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 9–14) https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jepr/1.1.02

 

APA

Salari, H., Hansra, B. S., & Saharwat, Y. S. (2020). Effect of cultural practices on quality and yield of onion (Allium cepa L. Var. Safid e Paisaye). Journal of Ecoscience and Plant Revolution, 1(1), 9–14. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jepr/1.1.02

 

MLA

Salari, Hamid, et al. “Effect of Cultural Practices on Quality and Yield of Onion (Allium Cepa L. Var. Safid e Paisaye).” Journal of Ecoscience and Plant Revolution, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020, pp. 9–14. Zotero, doi:10.37357/1068/jepr/1.1.02.

 

Vancouver

Salari H, Hansra BS, Saharwat YS. Effect of cultural practices on quality and yield of onion (Allium cepa L. Var. Safid e Paisaye). J Ecosci Plant Rev. 2020;1(1):9–14.

 

Chicago

Salari, Hamid, B S Hansra, and Yashpal Singh Saharwat. 2020. “Effect of Cultural Practices on Quality and Yield of Onion (Allium Cepa L. Var. Safid e Paisaye).” Journal of Ecoscience and Plant Revolution 1 (1): 9–14. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jepr/1.1.02.

 

Elsevier

Salari, H., Hansra, B.S., Saharwat, Y.S., 2020. Effect of cultural practices on quality and yield of onion (Allium cepa L. Var. Safid e Paisaye). J. Ecosci. Plant Rev. 1, 9–14. https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jepr/1.1.02

 

IEEE

  1. Salari, B. S. Hansra, and Y. S. Saharwat, “Effect of cultural practices on quality and yield of onion (Allium cepa L. Var. Safid e Paisaye),” J. Ecosci. Plant Rev., vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 9–14, 2020, doi: 10.37357/1068/jepr/1.1.02.

 

Springer

Salari, H., Hansra, B.S., Saharwat, Y.S.: Effect of cultural practices on quality and yield of onion (Allium cepa L. Var. Safid e Paisaye). J. Ecosci. Plant Rev. 1, 9–14 (2020). https://doi.org/10.37357/1068/jepr/1.1.02.

Authors

Hamid Salari
Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Agriculture, Kabul University, Kabul, Afghanistan

B.S. Hansra
Department of Horticulture, Amity Institute of Horticulture Studies and Research, Amity University, Noida, India

Yashpal Singh Saharwat
Department of Soil Science, Indian Agriculture Research Institute, New Delhi, India

References
  1. Commodities by countries (2017) Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) (http://www.fao.org/faostat/en/#rankings/commodities_by_country) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  2. Mehta I (2017) “Origin and History of Onions” IOSR Journal Of Humanities And Social Science (vol. 22, no. 9, pp. 7–10)

  3. Upadhyay DRK (2016) “Nutraceutical, pharmaceutical and therapeutic uses of Allium cepa: A review” International Journal of Green Pharmacy (IJGP) (vol. 10, no. 1, ) https://doi.org/10.22377/ijgp.v10i1.612 (https://www.greenpharmacy.info/index.php/ijgp/article/view/612) Accessed: 22 April 2020

  4. Gami M, Patel DA, Patel M, Patel T, Patel H, et al. (2013) “Evaluation of different tillage depths and FYM levels on onion (Allium cepa Linn) bulb crop” AGRES – An International e-Journal (vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 20–27)

  5. Bharti N, Ram BR (2014) “Estimating variation in the production, quality and economics of onion in response to transplanting dates and sulphur fertilization” European Academic Research (vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 4831–4843)

  6. Deepak MAD, Ashok K, Ingo MW (2014) “Effect of spacing and planting time on growth and yield of onion var” Indian Journal of Horticulture (vol. 71, no. 2, pp. 207–210)

  7. Ali M, Rab A, Ali J, Ahmad H, Hayat S, et al. (2016) “Influence of transplanting dates and population densities on the growth and yield of onion” Pure and Applied Biology (vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 345–354) https://doi.org/10.19045/bspab.2016.50045

  8. Kanwar MS, Akbar PI (2013) “Effect of planting methods on performance of onion varieties under cold desert conditions” The Bioscan (vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 911–913)

  9. Geries L, Moursi E, Abo-Dahab A (2015) “Effect of irrigation levels, cultivation methods and plant densities on productivity, quality of onion crop and some water relations in heavy clay soils” Journal of Soil Sciences and Agricultural Engineering (vol. 6, no. 12, pp. 1467–1495) https://doi.org/10.21608/jssae.2015.43938

  10. Aboukhadrah SH, El - Alsayed AWAH, Sobhy L, Abdelmasieh W (2017) “Response of Onion Yield and Quality To Different Planting Date, Methods and Density” Egyptian Journal of Agronomy (vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 203–219) https://doi.org/10.21608/agro.2017.1203.1065

  11. Enciso J, Wiedenfeld B, Jifon J, Nelson S (2009) “Onion yield and quality response to two irrigation scheduling strategies” Scientia Horticulturae (vol. 120, no. 3, pp. 301–305) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scienta.2008.11.004

  12. Sumalatha BV, Kadam DR, Jayewar NE, Thakare YC (2017) “Seasonal incidence and influence of dates of sowing on thrips infestation in Kharif onion” Agriculture Update (vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 189–195) https://doi.org/10.15740/HAS/AU/12.TECHSEAR(1)2017/189-195

  13. Kabul Monthly Climate Averages (2019) World Weather Online (https://www.worldweatheronline.com/kabul-weather/kabol/af.aspx) Accessed: 1 November 2019

  14. Hamma I (2013) “Growth and yield of onion as influenced by plantin dates and mulching types in Samaru, Zaria” Search Results Web results International Journal of Advance Agricultural Research (vol. 1, no. 2013, pp. 22–26)

  15. Ahmed M, Hassan MS (1987) “Effects of land preparation and planting method on onion (Allium cepa L.) production in the Sudan Gezira” Acta Horticulturae (Netherlands). no. 84. vol. 84 - pp. 27–32. (http://agris.fao.org/agris-search/search.do?recordID=NL19790461773) Accessed: 22 April 2020

  16. Bosekeng G, Coetzer GM (2013) “Response of Onion (Allium cepa L.) to sowing dates” AJAR (vol. 8, no. 22, pp. 2757–2764) https://doi.org/10.5897/AJAR2013.7035

  17. Bosekeng G, Coetzer* GM (2015) “Response of onion (Allium cepa L.) to sowing date and plant population in the Central Free State, South Africa” AJAR (vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 179–187) https://doi.org/10.5897/AJAR2013.8071

  18. Ali J, Abdurrab, Muhammad H, Ali M, Rashid A, et al. (2016) “Effect of sowing dates and phosphorus levels on growth and bulb production of onion” Pure and Applied Biology (vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 406–417) https://doi.org/10.19045/bspab.2016.50053

  19. Abdulsalam MAA, Hamaiel AF (2004) “Effect of Planting Dates and Compouned Fertilizers on Growth, Yield and Quality of Hassawi Onion Under Al-Hassa Oasis Conditions” Scientific Journal of King Faisal University (Basic and Applied Sciences) (vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 65–79)

  20. Ahmed MK, Hassan MS (1978) “Response of onion (Allium cepa L.) to sowing date and plant population in the Central Free State, South Africa” Acta Hortic (vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 179–187) https://doi.org/10.5897/AJAR2013.8071

Acknowledgment

The author(s) has received no specific funding for this article/publication.

Editorial Board

  • Bulent Acma, Anadolu University, Turkey
  • Amer A. Taqa, University of Mosul, Iraq
  • Peter Yang, Case Western Reserve University, USA
  • Agnieszka Malinowska, AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland
    Editorial Board